Linked Servers And The Kerberos Double-Hop Problem

Jana Sattainathan shows how to set up Kerberos pass-through when dealing with linked servers:

Let us say you have SQLServer1 and you want to setup a linked server to SQLServer2 using “pass-through authentication”, a double-hop happens as explain in the article below. Basically, the first hop is when the user authenticates to SQLServer1 and the second hop when that gets passed on from SQLServer1 to SQLServer2.

The below article is a must-read before you proceed:

The three nodes involved in the double-hop as illustrated in the example are

  1. Client – The client PC from which the user is initiating connection to SQLServer1

  2. Middle server – SQLServer1

  3. Second server – SQLServer2

Dealing with the double-hop problem is far trickier than it should be; if you’ve had to deal with this, I recommend Jana’s guide.

Security And Zookeeper

Michael Han describes a few methods you can use to tighten up (or rather, introduce) security in ZooKeeper:

Four Letter Words (acronym as 4lw) is a very popular feature of the Apache ZooKeeper project. In a nutshell, 4lw is a set of commands that you can use to interact with a ZooKeeper ensemble through a shell interface. Because it’s simple and easy to use, lots of ZooKeeper monitoring solutions are built on top of 4lw.

The simplicity of 4lw comes at a cost: the design did not originally consider security, there is no built in support for authentication and access control. Any user that has access to the ZooKeeper client port can send commands to the ensemble. The 4lw commands are read only commands: no actions can be performed. However, they can be computing intensive, and sending too many of them would effectively create a DOS attack that prevents the ensemble’s normal operation.

Read on for details.

Synchronizing Logins And Jobs

Ryan Adams enumerates several methods for synchronizing logins and SQL Agent jobs across mirrored instances or Availabilty Group replicas:

There is an awesome set of PowerShell cmdlets out there written by MVP Chrissy LeMaire.  This method is my personal choice.  It works great and is easy to automate.  You can run it with SQLAgent or you can just use Scheduled Tasks in the OS.  The scheduled tasks method is a little cleaner, but you don’t get to see it in SQL Server.  Also if you are on a cluster and running Windows 2012 you can cluster the task scheduler as an added benefit.

Chrissy wrote this with the intent of making migrations easier, and she succeeded.  In fact, I made it a point to thank her at MVP Summit last year because it made my life insanely easier.  The advantage here is that you can automate a lot more than than just logins.  In fact you can migrate and automate pretty much anything at the server level.  Here is the link that I guarantee you are going to bookmark followed by a video demo where I show how to install and automate the syncing of logins using both the SQLAgent method and the Scheduled Tasks method.

https://dbatools.io/

DBATools would be my preference in this situation as well, but click through to see four other methods, as well as code.

Azure Private Virtual Networks

The Tech Junkie shows how to create a private virtual network in Azure:

In the previous blog post we created an Azure cloud service.  Now we are going to create a private virtual Azure network.  The importance of this is that when you create a virtual machine in Azure you will use this virtual network to connect to your virtual machine.

This is a screenshot-driven, step-by-step post that makes setting these up easy.

Discovering Orphaned Users

Adrian Buckman troubleshoots an access scenario:

First lets check that the User Does actually exist, we know the Server login exists otherwise the user would be complaining that they cannot connect to the SQL server instance.

Sure enough – there is the user ‘SQLUndercoverUser’ lets check out the permissions:

No problems there – the user has [db_datareader], [db_datawriter] and [db_owner] so we know there is not a permissions issue, so lets test this login by connecting to SQL server with the user credentials:

Connected to the Server with no issues, lets open a new query against SQLUnderCoverDB:

Hmm so despite having  permissions to access the database  we are receiving this error – we know that the password is correct too otherwise we wouldn’t be able to access the Server at all….

Adrian does a nice job of walking through the troubleshooting process, going from simple problems (does the user actually exist? does the user have permissions?) and into the real cause, which was orphaned SQL authenticated users.  Read the whole thing.

Kerberos Constrained Delegation On Power BI Report Server

Regis Baccaro shows how to set up constrained delegation when connecting Power BI Report Server to a SQL Server instance or Analysis Services cube:

In many demo cases, you will have an all-in-one server where you have installed Power BI Report Server, SSAS (tabular or multidimensional) and SQL Server. In those cases you don’t need any form for credentials delegation since the Report Server is on the same box than the data source.

But there are scenarios where you have a distributed environment like the one I have on my VMs demo domain and for jumping around servers and passing credentials around, you need to setup Kerberos Constrained Delegation. Furthermore you will need protocol transition for it to work in Power BI Report Server.

Read on for step-by-step instructions showing how to do this.

Whitelisting SQL Server Access

Patrick Keisler has a script to whitelist access to SQL Server:

A while back, I posted an article about creating a WhiteList for access to SQL Server. Since then I have received a bit of feedback that it was not working as designed. My apologies for taking so long, but I believe I have come up with a fix.

The main issue is the trigger will block some or even all access to the server after it’s created. As it turns out, the issues were really permission being denied. To see it in action, let’s create everything using the original code from here.

This is an interesting concept.  Resource whitelisting makes sense, though we tend only to use authentication-based whitelisting (i.e., creating logins).

Azure AD On Azure SQL DB

Arun Sirpal shows how to set up Azure SQL Database to use Azure Active Directory accounts:

I think it is important to highlight a couple of points, more specifically around the requirement of ADALSQL.DLL and proper setup of AD which I will highlight below and reference some links, please do this as it lays the foundation for you.

ADALSQL.DLL

You need ADALSQL.DLL which is part of the latest SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS) to test access. This stands for Active Directory Authentication Library for SQL Server.

This goes through some of the issues Arun had setting everything up and provides workarounds and explanations.

Securing Kafka-To-Spark

Mark Grover explains how to secure communications between Apache Kafka and Apache Spark:

However, to read data from secure Kafka in distributed fashion, we need Hadoop-style delegation tokens in Kafka (KAFKA-1696), support for which doesn’t exist at the time of this writing (Spring 2017).

We considered various ways to solve this problem but ultimately decided that the recommended solution to read data securely from Kafka (at least until Kafka delegation tokens support is introduced) would be for the Spark application to distribute the user’s keytab so it’s accessible to the executors. The executors will then use the user’s keytab shared with them, to authenticate with the Kerberos Key Distribution Center (KDC) and read from Kafka brokers. YARN distributed cache is used for shipping and sharing the keytab to the driver and executors, from the client (that is, the gateway node). The figure below shows an overview of the current solution.

This turns out to be a bit more difficult than I would have anticipated.

Azure SQL Data Warehouse Security

Grant Fritchey looks at what security measures are available within Azure SQL Data Warehouse:

Login Security

You have two core choices on logins. First, you have to create a SQL login at the server level for both Azure SQL Database and Azure SQL Data Warehouse. You can’t remove this or disable it (to my knowledge, and I’ve tried), so make the password a good one (and don’t lose it). You can then create other SQL logins, but this is not a recommended best practice. In fact, I wouldn’t do it at all unless I was forced because of some third party product (few of which currently support Azure anyway).

The next choice, the preferred choice, is to set up Azure Active Directory. With Azure AD you get all the functionality you’re used to with your local AD. Further, you can federate Azure AD with your local AD to control and manage the logins from within your network. You also get multi-factor authentication with Azure AD. We are talking real security here. Read through the documentation on setting up authentication to get it right. You can do the whole thing using Powershell commands, so there’s no excuse on automating it.

There aren’t as many security-related toggles as in an on-prem product, but Grant demonstrates what is available.

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