SQL On Linux Backups

Rob Sewell shows how to use Ola Hallengren’s solution to back up SQL Server databases on Linux using the SQL Agent:

Now the jobs are not going to run as they are as they have CmdExec steps and this is not supported in SQL on Linux so we have to make some changes to the steps. As I blogged previously, this is really easy using PowerShell

First we need to grab the jobs into a variable. We will use Get-SQLAgentJobHistory from the sqlserver module which you need to download SSMS 2016 or later to get. You can get it from https://sqlps.io/dl As we are targeting a Linux SQL Server we will use SQL authentication which we will provide via Get-Credential and then take a look at the jobs

It’s not “point, click, done,” but Rob shows you certainly can do it.

Testing Backups With dbatools

Sander Stad shows how to test database restorations en masse using dbatools:

Testing your backups is a tedious job and it takes a lot of time which I as a DBA don’t have. I don’t have the time to restore a database, run a DBCC command for every database that’s backed up.

There is a solution and it’s called “Test-DbaLastBackup” which is part of the dbatools module.

Rob Sewell also has a recent post on the topic.

Restoring Databases With dbatools

Rob Sewell shows how to restore a slew of databases using one dbatools command:

In my lab I had installed SQL 2016 on a server running Server 2016 TP5 which expired so I needed to re-install Windows and therefore needed to restore all of my user databases again. This was so easy using the dbatools module that I thought it was worth sharing to show how easy your disaster recovery process could be.

Having re-installed Windows and SQL and copied the backup files back to the server (although I could have used a network location), I then had to restore all of the user databases.

This is how I restored all of my user databases using the dbatools module command Restore-SQLBackupFromDirectory

Read on for the answer, as well as a warning that the upcoming dbatools 1.0 release may change some things.

Invoke-SqlCmd

Mike Fal defends Invoke-SqlCmd’s honor:

Why do people gripe so much about Invoke-SqlCmd then? Well, to understand this is to understand the history of SQLPS. For a long while, the SQL Server module for PowerShell was klunky and buggy. There were a lot of challenges with loading it and using it, such that many scripters decided to throw it out and write their own functions. In many cases, PowerShell folks would skip Invoke-SqlCmd not because it was bad, but because it came packaged with the rest of SQLPS and they wanted to avoid the entire module.

Now that the SQL Tools team has been reworking the module as SqlServer, this has become less of a concern. The module is less of a burden to load and the other components do not get in the way. There are also improvements and updates to the code to make it work better and serve more needs.

Mike makes good points, like how you can pretty much guarantee that Invoke-SqlCmd will be available, whereas you can’t always guarantee that third-party libraries (even if better) will be available on all systems at all times.

Adding Powershell Job Steps To Existing SQL Agent Jobs

Rob Sewell uses Powershell to add a Powershell job step to a set of existing SQL Agent jobs:

I put all of our jobs that I required on the estate into a variable called $Jobs. (You will need to fill the $Servers variable with the names of your instances, maybe from a database or CMS or a text file and of course you can add more logic to filter those servers as required.

$Jobs = (Get-SQLAgentJob -ServerInstance $Servers).Where{$_.Name -like '*PartOfNameOfJob*' -and $_.IsEnabled -eq $true}

Of course to add a PowerShell Job step the target server needs to be SQL 2008 or higher. If you have an estate with older versions it is worth creating a SMO server object (you can use a snippet) and checking the version and then getting the jobs like this

Click through for the process.

Powershell In Bash: Cursor Issues Fixed

Max Trinidad points out that the latest alpha for Powershell in Bash has fixed an annoying display issue:

Finally, the fix we all been waiting for has arrived with the newest release of PowerShell version v6.0.0-alpha.17. Now, when you installed the Ubuntu 16.04.1 version of PowerShell 6 in Bash on Windows 10, it works this time.

Thanks God! No more crazy cursor screen issues going on when you type commands and/or display results.

Max also shows how to install the latest version of Powershell in Bash on Ubuntu in Windows 10.

Automating SpeedPASS Generation

Wayne Sheffield has a Powershell script to generate SQL Saturday SpeedPASSes:

My good friend, Mr. Google, found this post by Kendal Van Dyke. This post has a PowerShell script that will download and merge all of the PDFs for selected attendees into one big PDF. This enables printing out all of the SpeedPASSes at once, instead of one-by-one. However, I have a couple of problems with this script in it’s current form. First, the instructions for how to get the information from the SQLSaturday admin site have changed (they did do a major web site change last year). Secondly, it downloads all of the PDFs one-by-one, and puts them into a temporary directory, where they are all merged together. In file-name order. Not alphabetically. This means that the manual sorting is still necessary. But hey – it’s PowerShell. Surely we can come up with a way to do this sorting for us!

So I decided to re-write this script to suit my needs. Kendal’s script downloads the SpeedPASS PDF files one-by one. However, the admin site allows us to download all of them in one zip file. I like this approach better. I ended up making two major changes to the script. The first change requires pre-downloading and extracting all of the SpeedPASSes files. The second change is to get them to merge alphabetically. Like Kendal’s script, this uses the PDFSharp assemblies. This requires using PowerShell 3.0 or higher.

Click through for the script, which is probably very helpful if you ever run a SQL Saturday event.

Using Desired State Configuration To Install SQL Server

Chris Lumnah shows how to use Powershell Desired State Configuration to automate installation and configuration of a new SQL Server instance:

So the installation of SQL Server is now fairly straightforward. The wizard does a nice job of guiding you along the way. 2016 even includes best practice suggestions for tempdb and instance file initialization. Along the way, Microsoft as given us ways to automate the installation of SQL Server. You can sysprep an instance, but this does not really automate the installation. It just helps create a template of an instance. At the end of the day, you still need to do things manually. You can also use a configuration file to assist here. This is a great step forward, but it does not allow for all of the things you need to do to configure a SQL server.

Powershell does. Desired State Configuration (DSC) is functionality built into Powershell that allows for the installation and configuration of a SQL Server.

Chris includes his script as well as a link for more information on DSC in case you aren’t familiar with the concept.

Test User Generation With Powershell

Rob Sewell shows how to use dbatools to create test user accounts quickly:

Of course we can use any source for our users – a database, an excel file, Active Directory or even just type them in.

We can use the Add-SQLLogin command from the sqlserver module to add our users as SQL Logins, but at present we cannot add them as database users and assign them to a role.

Rob includes a demo script as well, thereby making it even easier.

Automated Database Restoration And CHECKDB

Anthony Nocentino shows how to use dbatools to automate testing restoration of database backups and running DBCC CHECKDB against these restored backups:

Requirements

  1. Automation – Complete autopilot, no human interaction.
  2. Report job status – Accurate reporting in the event the job failed, the CHECKDB failed or the restore failed.

Solution

  1. Use dbaltools cmdlets for restore and CHECKDB operations
  2. Use SQL Agent Job automation, logging and alerting

So let’s walk through this implementation together.

You won’t get a turnkey solution from this blog post, but you will get a good process to follow.

Categories

March 2017
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