Shredding SSAS XEs

Bill Anton shows three separate methods for parsing SQL Server Analysis Services Extended Event data:

Warning, this method involves the use of .NET – proceed with caution! That said, please proceed because the results are certainly worth it.

The same 32MB file that took 5 minutes using the first method, 2 minutes using the second method, now only took ~3 seconds using this method. Also, the processing time is essentially linear – so even when we bump it up to 4 files (or ~128MB of data) its only going to take ~12 seconds. This would have brought us down to under 5 minutes to process all 3GB of data.

Again, I’m not a .NET expert (not really even a novice) so the code I’m sharing is most likely terrible…but it works (at least for me) and its fast. So here it is…read through it and feel free to heckle me in the comments 😉

Don’t heckle Bill; thank him.

Watch TMP Space

Erin Stellato shows us that Extended Events and Profiler both use local temp storage:

Depending on what events you have configured for Profiler, your filter(s), the workload, and how long you run Profiler, you could generate more events than the UI can handle. Therefore, they’ll start buffering to the User TMP location. If you’re not paying attention, you can fill up the C: drive. This can cause applications (including SQL Server) to generate errors or stop working entirely. Not good.

Reference: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms174203.aspx

Now, back to the original question. Does the same problem exist for Extended Events? Only if you’re using the Live Data Viewer.  After you have an event session created (you can just use system_health for this example), within Management Studio, go to Management | Extended Events | Sessions, select the session and right-click and select Watch Live Data

This is one of those things you hardly think about, but it makes sense:  that data’s got to be stored somewhere if things are moving too fast for the app.

Telemetry XEvent

Kendra Little is sleuthing:

There’s something quite odd about this session. It has no target! The data isn’t being written to memory in the ring buffer or to a file or even a counter.

So I did a little testing. I right clicked the session and selected ‘Watch Live Data’ to see if I could consume the data flowing through in SQL Server Management studio even though it didn’t have a target. And then I ran this in another session:

It looks like this extended event is designed to track serious error messages.  I’m liking it and hope it sticks around in RTM.

Filtering Traces & XEs

Erin Stellato explains how to filter trace files and Extended Events:

Extended Events

Filtering events from an Extended Events file is even easier. Open the .xel file within Management Studio, then select Extended Events | Filters (you can also select the Filters icon in the Extended Events toolbar).

This may be the only case in which XE is easier than a trace…

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June 2017
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