Grooming The Error Log

Mark Wilkinson explains how to keep your SQL Server error logs in check:

We typically think of error logs as somewhere to go to find issues, but what if your error logs ARE the issue? Like most anything else in SQL Server, if you neglect your error logs you can run into trouble. Even on a low-traffic SQL Server instance, a bad piece of code, or a hardware issue, could easily fill your error logs, and with the introduction of Hekaton in SQL Server 2014, the SQL Server error log started getting a lot more data pumped into it than you might have been used to before. What this means for the DBA is that you can quickly start filling your main system drive (if your SQL install and error logs are in the default location) with massive error logs. So what questions should you be answering about error logs to make sure you don’t run into problems?

Read on to learn more.

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