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Category: Virtualization

“No Healthy Upstream” Error in vCenter

Denny Cherry diagnoses a problem:

Over the weekend, I was configuring our new VMware servers. I was happily working around when all of a sudden, vCenter started showing the hated “no healthy upstream” message on the vCenter website.

Thankfully, this was not the first time I’d seen this happen, and it usually occurs randomly (at least in my experience). The solution is easier than most people would think.

Click through to learn what you should do if you see that error.

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Running SQL Server on an M2 Processor

Anthony Nocentino operates a Mac:

Last week I purchased a shiny new MacBook Air with an M2 processor. After I got all the standard stuff up and running, I set out to learn how to run SQL Server containers on this new hardware. This post shows you how to run SQL Server on Apple Silicon using colima.

Colima is a container runtime that runs a Linux VM on your Mac. This Linux VM runs using the Virtualization framework hypervisor native in MacOS. Your containers will run inside this virtual machine.

Read on to see what you’d need for the task.

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STONITH Resources for Pacemaker Clusters

Andrew Pruski picks up Chekov’s Gun:

Recently I had to create another pacemaker cluster, this time on-premises using VMWare virtual machines. The steps to create the pacemaker cluster and deploy an availability group where pretty much the same as in my original post (minus any Azure marlarkey) but one step was different, creating the STONITH resource.

A STONITH resource is needed in a pacemaker cluster as this is what prevents the dreaded split brain scenario…two nodes thinking that they’re the primary node. If the resource detects a failed node in the cluster it’ll restart that node, hopefully allowing it to come up in the correct state.

Read on to see how Andrew did it.

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SQL Server 2022 and S3 Object Integration

Anthony Nocentino does some PolyBase work:

In this blog post, I’ve implemented two example environments for using SQL Server 2022’s s3 object integration. One for backup and restore to s3 compatible object storage and the other for data virtualization using Polybase connectivity to s3 compatible object storage. This work aims to get you up and running as quickly as possible to work with these new features. I implemented this in Docker Compose since that handles all the implementation and configuration steps for you. The complete code for this is available on my GitHub repo…I’m walking you through the implementation here in this post.

In my post Setting up MinIO for SQL Server 2022 s3 Object Storage Integration we did this step by step at the command line. Using Docker Compose it will do all the hard work for you and you can get up and running fast.

Let’s walk through what you’ll get in each environment.

Read the whole thing, especially the note at the bottom about minimum RAM requirements on the Docker container.

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Removing a Data Disk from a Running Azure VM

Joey D’Antoni tightrope walks without a net for fun:

I was working with a client recently, were we had to reconfigure storage within a VM (which is always a messy proposition). In doing so, we were adding and removing disks from the VM. this all happened mostly during a downtime window, so it wasn’t a big deal to down a VM, which is how you can remove a disk from a VM via the portal. However, upon further research, I learned that through the portal you can remove a disk from a running VM.

Read on to see how. Though I’d generally still recommend shutting the VM off first just to be sure.

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Working with Azure VM Scale Sets

Arun Sirpal explains the benefit behind scale sets in Azure:

I really like scale sets. It lets you create and manage up to 1000 load balanced VMs per availability zone using windows or Linux images. (We can have flexible or uniforms modes for orchestration which dictates if you go down the homogenous VM route or a mix, where a mix is the flexible option.

There are many other benefits too apart from scaling, such as built-in load balancing options, increased resiliency via 3 Availability Zones and from a cost perspective you can couple scale sets with Azure Hybrid benefit or even use reserved instances – cost is important in the cloud!

Read the whole thing.

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823/824 Alerts with SQL Server and VMware

David Klee loops us in on a tricky-to-catch problem:

We’ve been tracking a weird state with SQL Server virtual machines on VMware and possible warnings on database corruption while VM backups are running, largely centered around (but not isolated to) the tempdb database.

TLDR: We’ve now got a VMware KB article on this situation that you and your VM admins should read if you hit the condition and fall into the specifics listed below. Reference VMware KB 88201 for more details.

Read on for David’s thoughts and what to do if you hit this problem.

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Seeing Top N in Power BI

Reza Rad does some filtering:

I have previously written articles about how you can write a measure in DAX that helps with TOP N filtering. However, you may not need that calculation for many situations. If all you want is just simply to get the top 10 customers based on the sales amount, or bottom 5 products, etc, then you can simply use the visual-level filter GUI to perform this filtering. This is not a new functionality in Power BI, However, many users might not have yet seen it, so I’ll explain it in this short article and blog.

Read on to understand when you can use this and when you should go to TOPN() in DAX.

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VM Creation via ARM Template

Martin Schoombee keeps customer software separated:

As a consultant I work on at least a few projects at a time, and prefer to isolate my development environments by creating an Azure VM for each customer. Isolating the environments are great because I can focus on the software and setup I need for that customer, and will never be in a situation where VPN clients or different software versions clash with each other.

With my development environments in Azure I am truly mobile, can work from anywhere and can lose my working machine at any point without much impact beyond getting another one.

Click through to see how Martin can do this with hardly a problem.

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