Finding Three-Part or Four-Part Names in SQL Server

Louis Davidson shows how we can find three-part or four-part naming in T-SQL code:

In order to make this work, one of the considerations is to eliminate cross database dependencies, as you can’t reference objects that don’t exist in views, and even in stored procedures, which offer delayed resolution of objects, you can’t test the code without the database it is referencing.

In addition, and somewhat more important to the process, is dealing with three part names that reference the name of the database your object is in. During the comparison process, the database can be created with a name that is different from your target database to compare to (referred to as a shadow database.) So if you are in database X and have references to X.schema.table, but the database is generated as X_Shadow, the X. is now a cross database reference rather than the local reference you are desiring.

Four part names to linked servers are a different sort of nightmare, but one that is (hopefully) exceedingly rare. The queries presented will help with this as well.

Louis has a few scripts to help you find these. If your code is in source control already, you could also build a regular expression to search through it.

Enabling and Disabling Triggers

Kenneth Fisher shows how you can enable and disable triggers in SQL Server:

I tend to feel that a lot of people who use triggers don’t really understand them. That said, every now and again you have to deal with them. And in particular (for this post) you might need to disable and then re-enable them. Enabling and disable are identical commands in this case so I’m just going to use the DISABLEversion and you can just replace it with ENABLE as needed.

To be fair, the world might be a better place if we disabled a majority of triggers…

Changing Tables with Limited Downtime

I continue my series on near-zero downtime deployments and this time look at table changes:

The realm of More Significant Changes is not where you often want to be. There’s a lot of scaffolding code you need to write. Basically, suppose you want to make a repair on the 5th story exterior of an 8-story building. You have a couple of options: the YOLO option is to kick everybody out of the building and have people rappel from the top of the building down to the 5th story to make their changes. They need all of the people out of the building because shut up it’s a strained analogy. This approach is kind of inconvenient: people have to stay out of your building until your people are done repairing the exterior. That’s blocking in the database world.

On the other side, you can build a bunch of scaffolding and attach it to the exterior of the building, perform your repairs, and tear down that scaffolding. While the scaffolding is up, people come and go like normal and don’t even think about it. As you tear the scaffolding down, you temporarily block the door for a moment as you’re finishing your work. This is much more convenient for end users and fits the “near-zero downtime” approach we’re taking.

Strained analogies aside, this is a long post on making a series of table-related changes without your end users noticing.

Making Stored Procedure Changes With Limited Downtime

I continue my series on database development in a (near) zero downtime environment:

Versioning a procedure is pretty simple: you create a new procedure with alterations you want. Corporate naming standards where I’m at have you add a number to the end of versioned procedures, so if you have dbo.SomeProcedure, the new version would be dbo.SomeProcedure01. Then, the next time you version, you’ll have dbo.SomeProcedure02 and so on. For frequently-changing procedures, you might get up to version 05 or 06, but in practice, you’re probably not making that many changes to a procedure’s signature. For example, looking at a directory with exactly 100 procedures in it, I see 7 with a number at the end. Two of those seven procedures are old versions of procedures I can’t drop quite yet, so that means that there are only five “unique” procedures that we’ve versioned in a code base which is two years old. Looking at a different part of the code with 879 stored procedures, 95 have been versioned at least once in the 15 or so years of that code base’s existence. The real number is a bit higher than that because we’ve renamed procedures over time and renamings tend to start the process over as we might go from dbo.SomeProcedure04 to dbo.SomeNewProcedure when we redesign underlying tables or make other drastic architectural changes.

The secret is, I’m always versioning.

Benefits of Inline Indexes

Phil Factor covers a topic fairly close to my heart:

Usually, the added features of the CREATE TABLE syntax in new releases of SQL Server are esoteric, and unless you are dealing with memory-optimized tables or other esoteric stuff, they aren’t of great interest. However, the Inline INDEX for both a table and column index has just crept in quietly with SQL Server 2014 (12.x). This was interesting because the SQL Server team back-fitted it to all tables rather than just in-memory OLTP tables for which it was, at the time, found necessary. The new syntax was introduced which allows you to create certain index types inline with the table definition. These could be at column level, concerning just that column, or at the table level, with indexes containing several columns.

Why interesting? This affects multi-statement table functions, user-defined table types, table-valued parameters as well as table variables. It was considered a game-change for table variables because, for a start, it allowed non-unique indexes or explicit clustered indexes to be declared on columns for the first time because you can create indexes on table variables as part of the table definition. Of more significance were the table-level indexes that allowed you to specify multi-column indexes. Previous releases had allowed multi-column primary or unique constraints, but not explicitly named indexes. You still cannot declare an index after the table is created, which is a shame as there are good reasons for being able to do so after a table is stocked with data. Any sort of large import of data into a table that is over-indexed or prematurely-indexed is doomed to crawl rather than to run. I’ll show this later on in this article.

Click through for an analysis of inline indexes themselves as well as how they fit on table variables—something I tend not to do much.

Making Near-Zero Downtime Deployments Easier

I continue my series on developing for near-zero downtime deployments:

By default, SQL Server uses pessimistic locking, meaning that readers can block writers, writers can block readers, and writers can block writers. In most circumstances, you can switch from Read Committed to Read Committed Snapshot Isolation and gain several benefits. RCSI has certainly been in the product long enough to vet the code and Oracle has defaulted to an optimistic concurrency level for as long as I can remember.

The downtime-reducing benefit to using RCSI is that if you have big operations which write to tables, your inserts, updates, and deletes won’t affect end users. End users will see the old data until your transactions commit, so your updates will not block readers. You can still block writers, so you will want to batch your operations—that is, open a transaction, perform a relatively small operation, and commit that transaction. I will go into batching in some detail in a later post in the series, so my intent here is just to prime you for it and emphasize that Read Committed Snapshot Isolation is great.

Now that I have the core concepts taken care of, the next posts in the series move into practical implementation examples with a lot of code.

UNCOMPRESS Isn’t DECOMPRESS

Solomon Rutzky strives to solve the question, “What is the UNCOMPRESS function anyhow?”:

With no clear indications of what the UNCOMPRESS function does, we can at least pass in some simple values to see what comes back, and see if we can make sense of the output. For the following tests, please keep in mind that “8-bit” refers to the VARCHARCHAR, and TEXT (deprecated) datatypes. And, “16-bit” refers to the NVARCHARNCHARNTEXT (deprecated),and XML datatypes.

Read on as Solomon figures out what it does and how non-useful it is for anybody nowadays.

Generating Reference Numbers With Sequences

Kevin Feasel

2019-02-25

T-SQL

Matthew McGiffen shares one technique to generate reference numbers using a sequence and the FORMAT function:

One thing to note is that, while the sequence will generally produce unique number, it is still worth enforcing that in your table definition with a unique constraint i.e.

ALTER TABLE dbo.Orders ADD CONSTRAINT UQ_Orders_OrderReference UNIQUE(OrderReference);

This prevents someone from issuing an UPDATE command that might create a duplicate reference. 

As long as you can live with the occasional gap in your reference number, sequences are a good solution to the problem.

COUNT And NULL

Bert Wagner explains some of the trickiness of COUNT and NULL values in SQL Server:

One thing I see fairly often (and am occasionally guilty of myself) is using COUNT(DISTINCT) and DISTINCT interchangeably to get an idea of the number of unique values in a column.

While they will sometimes give you the same results, depending on the data the two methods may not always be interchangeable.

Click through for examples.

Fun With QUOTENAME

Louis Davidson shares some tips on using the QUOTENAME function:

Or if you are Rob Volk (@sql_r on Twitter), and you want to create an annoying database on your best frenemy’s SQL Server that includes brackets in the name, like:

This [database] Is Awesome

You will need to do:

CREATE DATABASE [This [database]] Is Awesome];

I’m not saying you should do that, but I’m also not saying you shouldn’t.

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