Memory-Optimized Tables In Query Store

Enrico van de Laar looks at how Query Store treats memory-optimized tables and natively compiled stored procedures:

Interestingly enough, no runtime statistics are returned for our natively stored procedure. As it turns out, we need to specifically enable the collection of statistics for natively compiled stored procedures through the sp_xtp_control_query_exec_stats stored procedure. Keep in mind, though, that enabling the collection of statistics for natively-compiled stored procedure can cause performance degradation. Thankfully we can very easily control the collection of statistics by enabling it for only specific natively compiled stored procedures and turn it on and off directly.

Read the whole thing.  Long story short:  they work together nicely.

Introducing Query Store

Thomas LeBlanc takes a brief look at Query Store:

Here, you will see the four default reports that come with this Option.

  1. Regressed Queries – shows query history and changes in statistics

  2. Overall Resource Consumption – history of resources used in the database

  3. Top resource Consuming Queries – Top x of queries using the most resources

  4. Tracked Queries – enables you to see multiple query plans for a T-SQL statement and compare the plans or force a plan

For DBAs, this is one of the biggest reasons to upgrade to 2016.

Cardinality Estimator Regressions

SQL Scotsman has a great post on figuring out which of your queries have become worse as a result of the SQL Server cardinality estimator changes in 2014:

Instantly it is apparent that the most resource intensive query was the same query across both workload tests and note that the query hash is consistent too.  It is also apparent that this query performs worse under the new cardinality estimator model version 120.  To investigate and understand why this particular query behaves differently under the different cardinality estimators we’ll need to look at the actual query and the execution plans.

Looking at the information in #TempCEStats and the execution plans, the problematic query below belongs to the SLEV stored procedure.

There’s also a discussion of Query Store in there, but it’s important to understand how to figure this out even if you’re on 2014 and don’t have access to Query Store.

Modifying The Query Store

Grant Fritchey answers a query store question:

When I was presenting on this topic at the PASS Summit a few weeks ago, one great question came up (great question = answer is “I don’t know”), well, I defaulted to an “I don’t know” answer, but my guess was, “No.” The question was: can you take a plan from one server, let’s say a test server, export it in some way, and then import it to production? In this manner, you ensure that a plan you like gets into production without having to clear the plan from cache & generate a plan by running the query.

Great idea.

Read on for the answer, as well as ways to manipulate query store data.

Query Store Filegroups

Kendra Little links to a Connect item:

Can you change the filegroup where Query Store keeps its data?

I thought there might be a trick to use a different filegroup for Query Store by using the default filegroup setting in SQL Server before enabling it, but NOPE!

Please vote for this to be improved in this Connect Item.

I concur; Query Store can grow to be pretty large on busy systems, so diligent DBAs who want to keep PRIMARY as small as possible will suddenly find a multi-gigabyte Query Store slowing down those PRIMARY filegroup restores.

Query Store Isn’t A Forensics Engine

Grant Fritchey shows that Query Store has a limited capability of finding “ill-behaving” queries at a point in time:

Here’s a great question I received: We had a problem at 9:02 AM this morning, but we’re not sure what happened. Can Query Store tell us?

My first blush response is, no. Not really. Query Store keeps aggregate performance metrics about the queries on the database where Query Store is enabled. Aggregation means that we can’t tell you what happened with an individual call at 9:02 AM…

Well, not entirely true.

Query Store isn’t a total solution for “Why was the system slow at XX:XX?” types of questions.  This does not diminish its value as long as you do not try to treat it as your only monitoring solution.

Why Force Query Store Plans

Grant Fritchey explains the wherefore behind query store plan forcing:

But, what else does Force Plan do for you? What if you never experience bad parameter sniffing (you do, but I’m not going to argue the point)? Is there something else that Force Plan can do for you? Heck yes! The whole point of creating the Query Store was in order to address Plan Regression. What the heck is plan regression? When Microsoft makes any change to the Query Optimizer, and those changes come all the time, it’s possible that you might see a change in your execution plans. Most of the time, it’s going to be a positive change. That’s why they’re changing the Optimizer after all, to improve it. However, sometimes, you’re benefiting from the old behavior of the Optimizer and that new plan doesn’t work as well as the old plan. This is plan regression. When Microsoft changed the Cardinality Estimation engine in SQL Server 2014, more than a few people experienced the new estimator giving row estimates that resulted in a different execution plan that didn’t perform as well as the old plan. This is plan regression. What to do?

This is a good read.

Query Store And Forcing Plans

Andy Kelly explains that forcing query plans using Query Store doesn’t always result in exactly the same plan being used:

Let’s summarize the situation. We have 2 query plans in the Query Store and the most recent one is also the current plan in the plan cache that is being used for all new executions of this procedure. But that plan is bad for all but .1% of the values we may pass in to the procedure. The previous plan in the Query Store is a much better plan overall and that is the one we want to ensure is used regardless of the value passed in. As such we go ahead and force the plan using the provided tools or TSQL which sets the is_forced_plan to 1 for the 1st plan in sys.query_store_plan. As a simplified explanation this action invokes a recompile and the current plan (which was bad) is replaced with a new plan that is based on the one we forced. That new plan now becomes the current one in the cache and is now the one in the Query Store that all new statistics are tied to as well.

Most people would think that if they forced a particular plan that was in the Query Store and it was marked as forced we would in fact be using that very same plan identified by the plan_id and query_plan_hash which is tied to the plan we forced. Keep in mind that if there were problems with the recompile such as it was missing an index that was there when the original plan was created we would get an error which would be listed in the force failure columns and a different plan would obviously need to be used. Errors aside most of the time when we force a plan it gets recompiled and we end up with the same plan as that which we forced. If that plan is the same as the original one we forced it will have the same query_plan_hash and thus the same plan_id.  All future executions will now use that plan and all statistics will be tied to it as well.  This is exactly what we would expect once we forced a plan in the Query Store.

If you’re looking at using Query Store, definitely read this post.

Query Store And Better Plans

Grant Fritchey asks, what happens when you force a Query Store plan and later a better plan becomes available?

Let’s answer a different question first. What happens when the plan gets invalidated, when the index being used gets dropped or some other structural change occurs so that the plan is no longer valid? I answered that question in this blog post. The plan being forced, after the object is dropped, becomes invalid, so that plan can no longer be used. The Query Store still attempts to apply the plan during any recompile or compile event of the query in question, but it fails and a proper plan is used. All this means, I think, the Query Store is going to ignore the new index, since a new index doesn’t invalidate an existing plan. A new index just makes new plans possible. However, when I was asked this question, this wasn’t something I had tested, so I gave a speculative, best guess, answer with plenty of caveats and the promise to provide a tested answer ASAP. Here we go.

Read on for the full answer.

Query Store And Dropped Objects

Grant Fritchey gives us a potential nightmare scenario with Query Store:

Along comes our aggressive junior DBA who decides that there are “too many” indexes on the server. No, I don’t know what that means either, but they evidently read it on the internet or something so they drop the index we created before:

1
DROP INDEX TransactionOccurredWhenNCI ON Warehouse.StockItemTransactions;

What now happens to our lovely execution plan and the plan forcing? We’ll take a look at two events in Extended Events, sql_statement_recompile and query_store_plan_forcing_failed. Nothing happens immediately on dropping the index. The plans associated with that object, if any, are marked as invalid in the cache. The next time we call the query it’s going to recompile and we can see the event:

The result is a bit happier than I would have expected; I was looking forward to a “and the world came crashing down” conclusion.

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