Comparing TensorFlow Versus PyTorch

Anirudh Rao compares PyTorch to TensorFlow:

For small-scale server-side deployments both frameworks are easy to wrap in e.g. a Flask web server.

For mobile and embedded deployments, TensorFlow works really well. This is more than what can be said of most other deep learning frameworks including PyTorch.

Deploying to Android or iOS does require a non-trivial amount of work in TensorFlow.

You don’t have to rewrite the entire inference portion of your model in Java or C++.

Other than performance, one of the noticeable features of TensorFlow Serving is that models can be hot-swapped easily without bringing the service down.

Read on for the full comparison.

What’s New With Machine Learning Services

Niels Berglund looks at SQL Server 2019’s Machine Learning Services offering for updates:

So, when I read What’s new in SQL Server 2019, I came across a lot of interesting “stuff”, but one thing that stood out was Java language programmability extensions. In essence, it allows us to execute Java code in SQL Server by using a pre-built Java language extension! The way it works is as with R and Python; the code executes outside of the SQL Server engine, and you use sp_execute_external_script as the entry-point.

I haven’t had time to execute any Java code as of yet, but in the coming days, I definitely will drill into this. Something I noticed is that the architecture for SQL Server Machine Learning Services has changed (or had additions to it).

That Java support is for Spark, I’d imagine.  And I hope they allow for Scala.

Hadoop + SQL Server In 2019

Travis Wright shows off a big part of what the SQL Server team has been working on the last couple of years:

SQL Server 2019 big data clusters provide a complete AI platform. Data can be easily ingested via Spark Streaming or traditional SQL inserts and stored in HDFS, relational tables, graph, or JSON/XML. Data can be prepared by using either Spark jobs or Transact-SQL (T-SQL) queries and fed into machine learning model training routines in either Spark or the SQL Server master instance using a variety of programming languages, including Java, Python, R, and Scala. The resulting models can then be operationalized in batch scoring jobs in Spark, in T-SQL stored procedures for real-time scoring, or encapsulated in REST API containers hosted in the big data cluster.

SQL Server big data clusters provide all the tools and systems to ingest, store, and prepare data for analysis as well as to train the machine learning models, store the models, and operationalize them.
Data can be ingested using Spark Streaming, by inserting data directly to HDFS through the HDFS API, or by inserting data into SQL Server through standard T-SQL insert queries. The data can be stored in files in HDFS, or partitioned and stored in data pools, or stored in the SQL Server master instance in tables, graph, or JSON/XML. Either T-SQL or Spark can be used to prepare data by running batch jobs to transform the data, aggregate it, or perform other data wrangling tasks.

Data scientists can choose either to use SQL Server Machine Learning Services in the master instance to run R, Python, or Java model training scripts or to use Spark. In either case, the full library of open-source machine learning libraries, such as TensorFlow or Caffe, can be used to train models.

Lastly, once the models are trained, they can be operationalized in the SQL Server master instance using real-time, native scoring via the PREDICT function in a stored procedure in the SQL Server master instance; or you can use batch scoring over the data in HDFS with Spark. Alternatively, using tools provided with the big data cluster, data engineers can easily wrap the model in a REST API and provision the API + model as a container on the big data cluster as a scoring microservice for easy integration into any application.

I’ve wanted Spark integration ever since 2016 and we’re going to get it.

Reticulate: Python-R Interop

Kevin Feasel

2018-09-24

Python, R

Adnan Fiaz walks us through an example of using the reticulate library to call Python from R:

So what exactly does reticulate do? It’s goal is to facilitate interoperability between Python and R. It does this by embedding a Python session within the R session which enables you to call Python functionality from within R. I’m not going to go into the nitty gritty of how the package works here; RStudio have done a great job in providing some excellent documentation and a webinar. Instead I’ll show a few examples of the main functionality.

Just like R, the House of Python was built upon packages. Except in Python you don’t load functionality from a package through a call to librarybut instead you import a module. reticulate mimics this behaviour and opens up all the goodness from the module that is imported.

This is a good intro to a package which is already useful but I think will be even better over time as R & Python interoperability becomes the norm.  H/T R-Bloggers

Building A Neural Network In R With Keras

Pablo Casas walks us through Keras on R:

One of the key points in Deep Learning is to understand the dimensions of the vector, matrices and/or arrays that the model needs. I found that these are the types supported by Keras.

In Python’s words, it is the shape of the array.

To do a binary classification task, we are going to create a one-hot vector. It works the same way for more than 2 classes.

For instance:

  • The value 1 will be the vector [0,1]
  • The value 0 will be the vector [1,0]

Keras provides the to_categorical function to achieve this goal.

This example doesn’t include using CUDA, but the data sizes are small enough that it doesn’t matter much.  H/T R-Bloggers

Running Google Translate Inside SQL Server ML Services

David Fowler shows us how to use SQL Server Machine Learning Services to call the Google Translate API via Python:

In my recent post, Installing External Modules into SQL Server’s Python I had a look at just how simple it is to import external modules into Python so that they can be used within SQL Server.

In this post I’d like to show you a little something to demonstrate how we can integrate one of these modules into SQL Server and just how powerful this can be.

This is really just for fun and it may not really be something that you’d want to put out into production but when I happened to notice that there’s a Python module that interfaces with Google Translate, I wondered to myself if it’d be possible to write a procedure that could take a string and automatically translate it into our native language.

There are a couple of setup steps but once you get past them, it’s easy going.

Network Analysis With Python In Power BI

Tori Tompkins shows us how to use the NetworkX package in Power BI:

The data I used was created to demonstrate this task in Power BI but there are many real-world network datasets to experiment with provided by Stanford Network Analysis Project. This small dummy dataset represents a co-purchasing network of books.

The data I loaded into Power BI consisted of two separate CSVs. One, Books.csv, consisted of metadata pertaining to the top 40 bestselling books according to Wikipedia and their assigned IDs. The other, Relationship.csv, was an edgelist of the book IDs which is a popular method for storing/ delivering network data. The graph I wanted to create was an undirected, unweighted graph which I wanted to be able to cross-filter accurately. Because of this, I duplicated this edgelist and reversed the columns so the ToNodeId and FromNodeId were swapped. Adding this new edge list onto the end of the original edgelist has created a dataset with can be filtered on both columns later down the line. For directed graphs, this step is unnecessary and can be ignored.

Once loaded into Power BI, I duplicated the Books table to create the following relationship diagram as it isn’t possible to replicate the relationship between FromNodeId to Book ID and ToNodeId to Book ID with only one Books table.

Read on for an example using this data set.

Installing External Python Modules In SQL Server

Kevin Feasel

2018-09-04

Python

David Fowler shows how to import an external Python module into SQL Server Machine Learning Services:

But how do we go about installing them into SQL Server?  Now I’m a DBA and not a Python wizz so had to do a little digging to figure it out but to be honest, it’s fairly easy.

I don’t know how many other DBAs know that we can install these modules or even how to do it so I thought I’d write up a quick post explaining it.

First things first, you’re going to need to do this from your SQL Server.

Read on for the instructions.

Explaining Keras Models With LIME

Shirin Glander shares her slide deck on explaining Keras image classification models with LIME:

Here I am sharing the slides for a webinar I gave for SAP about Explaining Keras Image Classification Models with LIME.

Slides can be found here: https://www.slideshare.net/ShirinGlander/sap-webinar-explaining-keras-image-classification-models-with-lime

Read on for links to additional resources as well.

Examples Of Charts In Different Languages

David Smith points out a great repository of information on generating different types of charts in different libraries:

The visualization tools include applications like Excel, Power BI and Tableau; languages and libraries including R, Stata, and Python’s matplotlib); and frameworks like D3. The data visualizations range from the standard to the esoteric, and follow the taxonomy of the book Data Visualisation (also by Andy Kirk). The chart categories are color coded by row: categorical (including bar charts, dot plots); hierarchical (donut charts, treemaps); relational (scatterplots, sankey diagrams); temporal (line charts, stream graphs) and spatial (choropleths, cartograms).

Check out the Chartmaker Directory.

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