Technologies Surrounding Big Data Clusters In SQL Server 2019

Buck Woody has some long-term homework for people:

Some of these technologies and concepts are not owned or created by Microsoft – the concepts are universal, and a few of the technologies are open-source. I’ve marked those in italics.

I’ve also included a few links to a training resource I’ve found to be useful. I normally use LinkedIn Learning for larger courses, along with EdX, DataCamp, and many other platforms for in-depth training. The links I have indicated here are by no means exhaustive, but they are free, and provide a good starting point.

Click through for a list of some of the technologies in play.

Polybase And Azure Data Studio

Rajendra Gupta continues his series on Polybase in SQL Server 2019 with a look at Polybase integration in Azure Data Studio:

We have learned earlier that PolyBase in SQL Server 2019 Preview allows access to various data sources such as SQL Server, Oracle, MongoDB, Teradata, and ODBC based sources etc. Azure Data Studio SQL Server 2019 preview extension currently supports for SQL Server and Oracle data sources only from the External table wizard.

In this series, we will create an external table for SQL Server and explore some more features around it.

Launch Azure Data Studio and connect to the SQL Server 2019 preview instance. Right click on the database and launch ‘Create External Table’.

Rajendra also looks at some of the Polybase DMVs and the notion of predicate pushdown, which is critical to understand for writing Polybase queries which perform well.

Using Polybase External Tables To Connect To Oracle

Rajendra Gupta continues his Polybase series:

In part 2 of the series, we saw that the external table could be accessed similarly to a relational database table. One more advantage is that we can join them with any relational tables.

Let us see how we can join the external table with the relational DB tables. I have saved the data into a CSV file so we will import the table using my earlier article, SQL Server Data Import using SQL Operations Studio. Therefore, you can follow the article in the same way in the Azure Data Studio also. I will just give high-level steps to import data from flat file into Azure Data Studio in this article.

Click through for more.

Enhancements To Polybase In SQL Server 2019

Rajendra Gupta has a multi-part series on Polybase enhancements with SQL Server 2019.  Part one covers installation of SQL Server 2019 and Azure Data Studio:

You need to install Oracle JRE 7 update 51 or higher to install Polybase. If it is not installed, you will get below error message while checking the rules for installation.

To fix this error, go to ‘Java SE Runtime Environment 8 Downloads‘ and download Java SE Runtime Environment 8u191E. Double click on the setup file to install it.

Part two shows us how to install Oracle Express Edition and query it via SQL Server:

As discussed, so far below are the requirements to access Oracle database using PolyBase with Azure Data Studio

  • SQL Server 2019 preview 4

  • Azure Data Studio with SQL Server 2019 extension

  • Oracle Data Source

  • Polybase services should be running with SQL Server database services

Part three is forthcoming, as Rajendra mentions at the end of part 2.

Big Data Clusters In SQL Server 2019

James Serra lays out some of the architecture behind SQL Server 2019 Big Data Clusters:

While extract, transform, load (ETL) has its use cases, an alternative to ETL is data virtualization, which integrates data from disparate sources, locations, and formats, without replicating or moving the data, to create a single “virtual” data layer.  The virtual data layer allows users to query data from many sources through a single, unified interface.  Access to sensitive data sets can be controlled from a single location. The delays inherent to ETL need not apply; data can always be up to date.  Storage costs and data governance complexity are minimized.  See the pro’s and con’s of data virtualization via Data Virtualization vs Data Warehouse and  Data Virtualization vs. Data Movement.

SQL Server 2019 big data clusters with enhancements to PolyBase act as a virtual data layer to integrate structured and unstructured data from across the entire data estate (SQL Server, Azure SQL Database, Azure SQL Data Warehouse, Azure Cosmos DB, MySQL, PostgreSQL, MongoDB, Oracle, Teradata, HDFS, Blob Storage, Azure Data Lake Store) using familiar programming frameworks and data analysis tools:

James covers some of the reasoning behind this and the shift from using Polybase to integrate data with Hadoop + Azure Blob Storage to using SQL Server as a data virtualization engine.

Hadoop + SQL Server In 2019

Travis Wright shows off a big part of what the SQL Server team has been working on the last couple of years:

SQL Server 2019 big data clusters provide a complete AI platform. Data can be easily ingested via Spark Streaming or traditional SQL inserts and stored in HDFS, relational tables, graph, or JSON/XML. Data can be prepared by using either Spark jobs or Transact-SQL (T-SQL) queries and fed into machine learning model training routines in either Spark or the SQL Server master instance using a variety of programming languages, including Java, Python, R, and Scala. The resulting models can then be operationalized in batch scoring jobs in Spark, in T-SQL stored procedures for real-time scoring, or encapsulated in REST API containers hosted in the big data cluster.

SQL Server big data clusters provide all the tools and systems to ingest, store, and prepare data for analysis as well as to train the machine learning models, store the models, and operationalize them.
Data can be ingested using Spark Streaming, by inserting data directly to HDFS through the HDFS API, or by inserting data into SQL Server through standard T-SQL insert queries. The data can be stored in files in HDFS, or partitioned and stored in data pools, or stored in the SQL Server master instance in tables, graph, or JSON/XML. Either T-SQL or Spark can be used to prepare data by running batch jobs to transform the data, aggregate it, or perform other data wrangling tasks.

Data scientists can choose either to use SQL Server Machine Learning Services in the master instance to run R, Python, or Java model training scripts or to use Spark. In either case, the full library of open-source machine learning libraries, such as TensorFlow or Caffe, can be used to train models.

Lastly, once the models are trained, they can be operationalized in the SQL Server master instance using real-time, native scoring via the PREDICT function in a stored procedure in the SQL Server master instance; or you can use batch scoring over the data in HDFS with Spark. Alternatively, using tools provided with the big data cluster, data engineers can easily wrap the model in a REST API and provision the API + model as a container on the big data cluster as a scoring microservice for easy integration into any application.

I’ve wanted Spark integration ever since 2016 and we’re going to get it.

The Evolution Of Polybase

Asad Khan gets into improvements in SQL Server 2019:

  • Break down data silos and deliver one view across all of your data using data virtualization. Starting in SQL Server 2016, PolyBase has enabled you to run a T-SQL query inside SQL Server to pull data from your data lake and return it in a structured format—all without moving or copying the data. Now in SQL Server 2019, we’re expanding that concept of data virtualization to additional data sources, including Oracle, Teradata, MongoDB, PostgreSQL, and others. Using the new PolyBase, you can break down data silos and easily combine data from many sources using virtualization to avoid the time, effort, security risks and duplicate data created by data movement and replication. New elastically scalable “data pools” and “compute pools” make querying virtualized data lighting fast by caching data and distributing query execution across many instances of SQL Server.

Just in time for me to scramble to update Polybase slides for Conference Season…

Polybase Rejected Row Location

Casey Karst announces a nice improvement to Polybase on Azure SQL Data Warehouse:

Every row of your data is an insight waiting to be found. That is why it is critical you can get every row loaded into your data warehouse. When the data is clean, loading data into Azure SQL Data Warehouse is easy using PolyBase. It is elastic, globally available, and leverages Massively Parallel Processing (MPP). In reality clean data is a luxury that is not always available. In those cases you need to know which rows failed to load and why.

In Azure SQL Data Warehouse the Create External Table definition has been extended to include a Rejected_Row_Location parameter. This value represents the location in the External Data Source where the Error File(s) and Rejected Row(s) will be written.

This is a big improvement, one that I hope to see on the on-prem product.

Troubleshooting Polybase Installation Errors

John Paul Cook has an article looking at what to do when you have Oracle JRE 9 and want to use Polybase:

This article shows you how to troubleshoot a failed installation of SQL Server and how to implement a workaround to allow SQL Server 2017’s PolyBase feature to be installed when version 9 of the Java Runtime Environment (JRE) is present. An installation of all features in SQL Server 2017 has three external dependencies. Python, R, and the JRE are third party or open source software needed in a full installation. Changes to external software after the release of SQL Server 2017 can introduce breaking changes. Oracle, the company that owns Java, changed how Windows registry keys are named. This caused a breaking change for SQL Server 2017. Version 8 of the JRE is compatible with the SQL Server 2017 installer. Version 9 of the JRE is not. If version 9 of the JRE is the only version of the JRE on a Windows machine, it is not possible to install the PolyBase feature. The JRE version bug also is found in the SQL Server 2016 installer. The same workaround works for both SQL Server 2016 and 2017.

Good article.

Polybase And HDInsight

I have a post up on trying to integrate Polybase with HDInsight:

But now we run into a problem:  there are certain ports which need to be open for Polybase to work.  This includes port 50010 on each of the data nodes against which we want to run MapReduce jobs.  This goes back to the issue we see with spinning up data nodes in Docker:  ports are not available.  If you’ve put your HDInsight cluster into an Azure VNet and monkey around with ports, you might be able to open all of the ports necessary to get this working, but that’s a lot more than I’d want to mess with, as somebody who hasn’t taken the time to learn much about cloud networking.

As I mention in the post, I’d much rather build my own Hadoop cluster; I don’t think you save much maintenance time in the long run going with HDInsight.

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