Tuning Apache Spark Applications

Vidisha Gupta has a few tips for tuning Apache Spark programs:

Data Serialization – Serialization plays an important role in increasing the performance of any application. Spark provides two serialization libraries –

  • Java Serialization: By default, spark uses Java’s ObjectOutputStream framework which can work with any class that implements java.io.serializable. This serialization is flexible but slow and creates large serialized formats for many classes.

  • Kryo Serialization: Spark can use Kryo library to serialize objects. It is much faster and compact but does not support all serializable types. So we must register those classes which we want to be serialized. Therefore, Kryo uses indices instead of full class names to identify data types which reduce the size of the serialized data thereby increasing performance. We can initialize our spark conf by setting the value of the property spark.serializer to org.apache.spark.serializer.KryoSerializer. This serializer has a major impact on performance when we are shuffling or caching a large amount of data. To know more about this serializer, refer  Kryo documentation

There are some good tips in here.

Quick Spark Notes

Leela Prasad has a few quick notes on concepts in Apache Spark:

Broadcast Variables

Broadcast variables allow the programmer to keep a read-only variable cached on each machine rather than shipping a copy of it with tasks. They can be used, for example, to give every node a copy of a large input dataset in an efficient manner. Spark also attempts to distribute broadcast variables using efficient broadcast algorithms to reduce communication cost.
Spark actions are executed through a set of stages, separated by distributed “shuffle” operations. Spark automatically broadcasts the common data needed by tasks within each stage. The data broadcasted this way is cached in serialized form and deserialized before running each task. This means that explicitly creating broadcast variables is only useful when tasks across multiple stages need the same data or when caching the data in deserialized form is important.

There’s some good stuff on accumulators and the SparkSession object in there as well.

Azure Databricks Geospatial Analysis

Jose Mendes gives us an example of using Azure Databricks to perform geospatial analysis:

Magellan is a distributed execution engine for geospatial analytics on big data. It is implemented on top of Apache Spark and deeply leverages modern database techniques like efficient data layout, code generation and query optimization in order to optimize geospatial queries (further details here).

Although people mentioned in their GitHub page that the 1.0.5 Magellan library is available for Apache Spark 2.3+ clusters, I learned through a very difficult process that the only way to make it work in Azure Databricks is if you have an Apache Spark 2.2.1 cluster with Scala 2.11. The cluster I used for this experience consisted of a Standard_DS3_v2 driver type with 14GB Memory, 4 Cores and auto scaling enabled.

In terms of datasets, I used the NYC Taxicab dataset to create the geometry points and the Magellan NYC Neighbourhoods GeoJSON dataset to extract the polygons. Both datasets were stored in a blob storage and added to Azure Databricks as a mount point.

It sounds like this is much faster than using U-SQL to perform the same task.

Using Datadog To Monitor Spark Clusters On EMR

Priya Matpadi walks us through one way to monitor Spark clusters on Amazon ElasticMapReduce:

We recently implemented a Spark streaming application, which consumes data from from multiple Kafka topics. The data consumed from Kafka comprises different types of telemetry events generated by mobile devices. We decided to host the Spark cluster using the Amazon EMR service, which manages a fleet of EC2 instances to run our data-processing pipelines.

As part of preparing the cluster and application for deployment to production, we needed to implement monitoring so we could track the streaming application and the Spark infrastructure itself. At a high level, we wanted ensure that we could monitor the different components of the application, understand performance parameters, and get alerted when things go wrong.

In this post, we’ll walk through how we aggregated relevant metrics in Datadog from our Spark streaming application running on a YARN cluster in EMR.

Check it out.  If this is interesting, Priya’s blog has the full series.

Pivoting With Spark SQL

MaryAnn Xue shows us how to use the PIVOT operator in Spark SQL:

Pivot was first introduced in Apache Spark 1.6 as a new DataFrame feature that allows users to rotate a table-valued expression by turning the unique values from one column into individual columns.

The upcoming Apache Spark 2.4 release extends this powerful functionality of pivoting data to our SQL users as well. In this blog, using temperatures recordings in Seattle, we’ll show how we can use this common SQL Pivot feature to achieve complex data transformations.

The syntax is quite similar to the PIVOT syntax that SQL Server uses.

Logistic Regression With Apache Spark

Manoj Gautam shows how to perform a logistic regression with Apache Spark:

Since we are going to try algorithms like Logistic Regression, we will have to convert the categorical variables in the dataset into numeric variables. There are 2 ways we can do this.

  1. Category Indexing
  2. One-Hot Encoding

Here, we will use a combination of StringIndexer and OneHotEncoderEstimator to convert the categorical variables. The OneHotEncoderEstimator will return a SparseVector.

Click through for the code and explanation.

Protecting Hadoop Clusters From Malware

Michael Yoder and Suraj Acharya remind us that Hadoop clusters are made up of computers on a network, which means people will try to install malicious software:

Roughly two years ago there were a spate of attacks against the open source database solution MongoDB, as well as Hadoop. These attacks were ransomware: the attacker wiped or encrypted data and then demanded money to restore that data. Just like the recent attacks, the only Hadoop clusters affected were those that were directly connected to the internet and had no security features enabled. Cloudera published a blog post about this threat in January 2017. That blog post laid out how to ensure that your Hadoop cluster is not directly connected to the internet and encouraged the reader to enable  Cloudera’s security and governance features.

That blog post has renewed relevance today with the advent of XBash and DemonBot.

The origin story of XBash and DemonBot illustrates how security researchers view the Hadoop ecosystem and the lifecycle of a vulnerability. Back in 2016 at the Hack.lu conference in Luxembourg, two security researchers gave a talk entitled Hadoop Safari: Hunting for Vulnerabilities. They described Hadoop and its security model and then suggested some “attacks” against clusters that had no security features enabled. These attacks are akin to breaking in to a house while the front door is wide open.

Their advice is simple, but simple is good here:  it means you should be able to implement the advice without much trouble.

Change Data Capture With Databricks Delta

Ameet Kini and Denny Lee show how to use Databricks Delta to handle change data capture from different processes:

With Databricks Delta, the CDC pipeline is now streamlined and can be refreshed more frequently: Informatica => S3 => Spark Hourly Batch Job => Delta. In this scenario, Informatica writes change sets directly to S3 using Informatica’s Parquet writer. Databricks jobs run at the desired sub-nightly refresh rate (e.g., every 15 min, hourly, every 3 hours, etc.) to read these change sets and update the target Databricks Delta table.

With minor changes, this pipeline has also been adapted to read CDC records from Kafka, so the pipeline there would look like Kafka => Spark => Delta. In the rest of this section, we elaborate on this process, and how we use Databricks Delta as a sink for their CDC workflows.

With one of our customers, we implemented these CDC techniques on their largest and most frequently refreshed ETL pipeline. In this customer scenario, Informatica writes a change set to S3 for each of its 65 tables that have any changes every 15 minutes.   While the change sets themselves are fairly small (< 1000 records), their target tables can become quite large. Out of the 65 tables, roughly half a dozen are in the 50m-100m row range, and the rest are smaller than 50m. In Oracle, this pipeline would have run every 15 minutes, keeping in sync with Informatica. In Databricks Delta, we thought this would take close to an hour due to S3 latencies but ended up being pleasantly surprised with a 30 and even 15-minute refresh period depending on cluster size.

Click through for the rest of the story.

Using Hive Hooks

Pushkar Gujar shows us how to use Hive hooks, which behave a bit like triggers in relational databases:

To understand how data is consumed, we need to figure out answers to some basic questions like:

  • Which datasets (tables/views/DBs) are accessed frequently?
  • When are the queries run most frequently?
  • Which users or applications are heavily utilizing the resources?
  • What type of queries are running frequently?

The most accessed object can easily benefit from optimization like compression, columnar file format, or data decomposition. A separate queue can be assigned to heavy-resource-utilizing apps or users to balance the load on a cluster. Cluster resources can be scaled up during the timeframe when a large number of queries are mostly run to meet SLAs and scaled down during low usage tide to save cost.

Hive Hooks are convenient ways to answer some of the above questions and more!

Read on to learn how.

Untangling Kafka APIs

Kevin Feasel

2018-10-30

Hadoop

Stephane Maarek helps us make sense of when to use which Kafka API:

I identify 5 types of workloads in Apache Kafka, and in my opinion each corresponds to a specific API:

  • Kafka Producer API: Applications directly producing data (ex: clickstream, logs, IoT).

  • Kafka Connect Source API: Applications bridging between a datastore we don’t control and Kafka (ex: CDC, Postgres, MongoDB, Twitter, REST API).

  • Kafka Streams API / KSQL: Applications wanting to consume from Kafka and produce back into Kafka, also called stream processing. Use KSQL if you think you can write your real-time job as SQL-like, use Kafka Streams API if you think you’re going to need to write complex logic for your job.

  • Kafka Consumer API: Read a stream and perform real-time actions on it (e.g. send email…)

  • Kafka Connect Sink API: Read a stream and store it into a target store (ex: Kafka to S3, Kafka to HDFS, Kafka to PostgreSQL, Kafka to MongoDB, etc.)

Stephane then goes into detail on each of these.

Categories

December 2018
MTWTFSS
« Nov  
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31