Watch Named, Nested Transactions

Gail Shaw finishes her outstanding series on transactions:

The error was thrown by the ROLLBACK statement. As such, the transaction is still open, the locks are held and the transaction log space can’t be reused. Unless the application that called this was checking for open transactions, that transaction could potentially be left open for quite some amount of time, causing blocking and/or the transaction log to grow.

It’s not just that someone in the future might call the code from another stored proc within a transaction, it’s also that it might be that the code is called from an application which started a transaction. Or called from SSIS which started a transaction. It’s very hard to ensure that code is never called from within an existing transaction

Read the whole thing.

Check Bulk Insert Errors

Tom Staab points out bulk insert allows up to 10 errors by default:

The issue was that the last row in a text file contained the row count, so he needed to bulk import all but that last row.

My solution was to set maxerrors to 1 so the import would ignore the last row due to the error. Any other row with an error would still fail the import. This reminded me of one of my least favorite defaults in SQL Server, so I decided to write about it here as well. A lot of people don’t realize this, but by default a bulk insert will only fail after 10 errors. Why not 0? I’ve never understood that. If you don’t change the default and then bulk insert 20 rows of data from a file, it will only fail if over half of the rows cause an error.

Keep track of error incidence and what that means for your data.  The default of 10 errors does seem rather strange.

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May 2019
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