Bug In July Windows Updates Causing “TCP port is already in use” Errors

Jordon Riel warns us about a recent Windows update which can cause SQL Server’s database engine to fail to start up:

We have recently become aware of a regression in one of the TCP/IP functions that manages the TCP port pool which was introduced in the July 10, 2018 Windows updates for Windows 7/Server 2008 R2 and Windows 8.1/Server 2012 R2.

This regression may cause the restart of the SQL Server service to fail with the error, “TCP port is already in use”. We have also observed this issue preventing Availability Group listeners from coming online during failover events for both planned and/or unexpected failovers. When this occurs, you may observe errors similar to below in the SQL ERRORLOGs:

Error: 26023, Severity: 16, State: 1.
Server TCP provider failed to listen on [ <IP ADDRESS> <ipv4> <PORT>]. Tcp port is already in use.
Error: 17182, Severity: 16, State: 1.
TDSSNIClient initialization failed with error 0x2740, status code 0xa. Reason: Unable to initialize the TCP/IP listener. Only one usage of each socket address (protocol/network address/port) is normally permitted. 
Error: 17182, Severity: 16, State: 1.
TDSSNIClient initialization failed with error 0x2740, status code 0x1. Reason: Initialization failed with an infrastructure error. Check for previous errors. Only one usage of each socket address (protocol/network address/port) is normally permitted. 
Error: 17826, Severity: 18, State: 3.
Could not start the network library because of an internal error in the network library. To determine the cause, review the errors immediately preceding this one in the error log.
Error: 17120, Severity: 16, State: 1.
SQL Server could not spawn FRunCommunicationsManager thread. Check the SQL Server error log and the Windows event logs for information about possible related problems.

Read on for the solution.

SSAS Tabular Deployment Fails: Newtonsoft.Json Missing

Alex Whittles walks us through an error deploying a SQL Server Analysis Services tabular model:

Deploying an Analysis Services Tabular model to SSAS Azure using the Analysis Services Deployment Wizard. Both Visual Studio 2017 & SQL Server 2017 installed on the client.

Try and click on the ellipses to change the data source connection string or impersonation information results in a Newtonsoft.json error:

“Could not load file or assembly ‘Newtonsoft.Json, Version 6.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, ……”

As I like to joke, every single .NET project in existence includes Newtonsoft.Json.  As Alex shows, sometimes they don’t reference the right version.

Diagnosing A SQL Server Error Using WinDbg

Kevin Feasel

2018-07-16

Bugs

Dmitry Pilugin gives us a specific example of using WinDbg to track down a bug in SQL Server:

The important part is that the same stack with the same relative to a module addresses was in all the dumps.

To get an idea of what is going on, we may try to convert the relative address: Module(<sqlmodule>+hex), into a SQL Server’s method name. Probably the method’s name would be descriptive enough to give some information. This is the moment where WinDbg with public symbols may help.

You may download WinDbg from the here, and then download public symbols, you may use WinDbg documentation or here is an example of how to do it from Paul Randal, adopt it to your folders and version.

You should not debug a production server, because WinDbg will break any singe instruction execution, so make sure you have a test server with the exact same SQL Server version as production (in my case it was 13.0.4474.0).

I heartily second the comment that you never want to run the debugger in production.

Problem With Merge Replication And FILESTREAM

Gianluca Sartori walks us through an error when combining merge replication with FILESTREAM:

I published tables with FILESTREAM data before, but it seems like there is a particular planetary alignment that triggers an error during the execution of the snapshot agent.

This unlikely combination consists in a merge article with a FILESTREAM column and two UNIQUE indexes on the ROWGUIDCOL column. Yes, I know that generally it does not make sense to have two indexes on the same column, but this happened to be one of the cases where it did, so we had a CLUSTERED PRIMARY KEY on the uniqueidentifier column decorated with the ROWGUIDCOL attribute and, on top, one more NONCLUSTERED UNIQUE index on the same column, backed by a UNIQUE constraint.

Setting up the publication does not throw any error, but generating the initial snapshot for the publication does:

Cannot create, drop, enable, or disable more than one constraint,
column, index, or trigger named 'ncMSmerge_conflict_TestMergeRep_DataStream'
in this context. Duplicate names are not allowed.

This is a rather specific confluence of events, so it probably won’t affect many people.  Still, it is a bug.

Bug When Importing Packages In BimlExpress 2018

Kevin Feasel

2018-06-27

Biml, Bugs

Andy Leonard reports a bug as well as a temporary workaround for BimlExpress 2018:

I had no sooner published my blog post about the coolness of Biml 2018 when I encountered a bug trying to use one of the features I really like – converting SSIS packages to Biml using (FREE!) BimlExpress 2018.

My first response was, “Durnit! This worked in the test versions.” My second response was to drop a note into an issue-tracking site Varigence set up to record these kinds of things.

And then I started getting emails similar to, “Hey Andy, I get this error when I try to use the new ‘Convert SSIS Packages to Biml’ feature”…

David Stein has a workaround for us until Varigence can fix the bug.

Missing KB2919355 When Installing SQL Server

Ryan Allport explains how to install SQL Server 2016 on Windows Server 2012 R2 when you get the Rule “KB2919355 Installation” failed error message:

As you can see, the upgrade feature rules check failed around the KB2919355 installation. At this point, reading the error message, I assumed (I know, I know, it’s something we should never do as a DBA!) that the patch had been downloaded and applied during the latest round of Windows patching, and all that was required was a server reboot. I was wrong.

Upon running the upgrade again, I got the same error message. Hmm, annoying. So, after some Googling I was confident I knew what to do to resolve this; download and install the KB2919355 patch. So, I downloaded the patch from the official Microsoft website (KB2919355) and kicked off the installation.

There’s a bit more to it than “install the patch.”

Error Processing SSIS Task When TargetServerVersion Is SQL Server 2016

Shabnam Watson diagnoses an error condition when trying to run an Analysis Services processing task inside SQL Server Integration Services:

I ran into this problem a while ago at a client. They upgraded from Visual Studio 2013 to 2015 and the SSAS processing tasks started to error out immediately. The solution turned out to be setting the TargetSeverVersion to anything but SQL Server 2016. In this case, it was set to 2014 and that fixed the error.

Recently I ran into this post https://twitter.com/SQLKohai/status/994335086425399297 by Matt Cushing (@SQLKohai) and decided to dig in more.  Initially when I tested it, all was working fine. After I installed SSDT 2015 to test, I started getting the same error in SSDT 2017.  I played around with a DLL and got SSDT 2017 to work with all TargetVersionServers again. At the end I managed to break it again after I went through an uninstall and reinstall of all versions of SSDT. The reason I did the reinstall of SSDT was that I thought I might have had a broken registry entry that I was hoping the installation would fix. This did not work!

Read on for the solution and a detailed dive into the problem.

Azure Data Factory v2 And Decompression

Kevin Feasel

2018-04-23

Bugs, Cloud, ETL

Ben Jarvis notes a file naming bug with Azure Data Factory v2 when decompressing files:

ADF V2 natively supports decompression of files as documented at https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/data-factory/supported-file-formats-and-compression-codecs#compression-support. With this functionality ADF should change the extension of the file when it is decompressed so 1234_567.csv.gz would become 1234_567.csv however, I’ve noticed that this doesn’t happen in all cases.

In our particular case the file names and extensions of the source files are all uppercase and when ADF uploads them it doesn’t alter the file extension e.g. if I upload 1234_567.CSV.GZ I get 1234_567.CSV.GZ in blob storage rather than 1234_567.CSV.

Click through for more details and be sure to vote on his Azure Feedback bug if this affects you.

The Non-Blocking Segment Operator

Hugo Kornelius notes a documentation bug with the Segment operator:

The Segment operator, like all operators, is described at the Books Online page mentioned above. Here is the description, quoted verbatim:

Segment is a physical and a logical operator. It divides the input set into segments based on the value of one or more columns. These columns are shown as arguments in the Segment operator. The operator then outputs one segment at a time.

Looking at the properties of the Segment operator, we do indeed see the argument mentioned in this description, in the Group By property (highlighted in the screenshot). So this operator reads the data returned by the Index Scan (sorted by TerritoryID, which is required for it to work; this is why the Index Scan operator is ordered to perform an ordered scan), and divides it into segments based on this column. In other words, this operator is a direct implementation of the PARTITION BY spefication. Every segment returned by the operator is what we would call a partition for the ROW_NUMBER() function in the T-SQL query. And this enables the Sequence Project operator to reset its counters and start at 1 for every new segment / partition.

Read on to understand the issue and see Hugo’s proof.

Upgrading SQL Server 2017 Standard Edition

Jo Douglass hits an error when upgrading to SQL Server 2017 on Standard Edition:

A quick one to signal boost this issue and its solution, as I’m sure other people will run into it. If you’re on Standard Edition of SQL Server and upgrading to 2017, you might run into an issue where the database services portion of the upgrade fails. This seems to be related to SSIS.

If you experience this problem, mid-way through the upgrade you’ll receive this error in a pop-up:

Wait on the Database Engine recovery handle failed. Check the SQL Server error log for potential causes.

At the end of the upgrade, it will show that the database services section has failed. Checking the error log will show this:

Script level upgrade for database ‘master’ failed because upgrade step ‘ISServer_upgrade.sql’ encountered error 917, state 1, severity 15.

Read on for the answer and a workaround.

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