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Category: Azure Data Studio

Querying SQL Server from Python

Hasan Savran builds an Azure Data Studio notebook to query SQL Server from Python:

SQL Kernel is the default language, to query database with Python change SQL to Python 3. Probably, you will see the following message if this is the first time you are trying this. You need to install Python packages to be able to run python scripts. I have Visual Studio installed on my machine and I already have Python, I taught I could to use it by clicking “Use existing Python installation”. I was wrong, I couldn’t. This option looks for local installation files and when I point to Visual Studio Python files, it throws error in the middle of the installation. So, I will ignore this option for now.

In ADS, I haven’t gotten “Use existing Python location” to work either, so Hasan’s not alone in that regard.

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Creating Azure Data Studio Notebooks Using Powershell

Rob Sewell inverts the “Use Azure Data Studio to create Powershell notebooks” mantra:

This module contains only 3 commands at present

* Convert-ADSPowerShellForMarkdown

This will create the markdown link for embedding PowerShell code in a Text Cell for a SQL Notebook as described in this blog post

* New-ADSWorkBookCell

This command will create a workbook text cell or a code cell for adding to the New-ADSWorkBook command

* New-ADSWorkBook

This will create a new SQL Notebook using the cell objects created by New-ADSWorkBookCell

Click through for an example.

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Powershell Notebooks in Azure Data Studio

Aaron Nelson announces a new feature in Azure Data Studio:

In order to get all the nice intellisense and tab completion features of the PowerShell language inside your PowerShell Notebooks, be sure to install the PowerShell extension from the Azure Data Studio marketplace.

At this point, the biggest remaining language is R, though I’d love to see F# support as well (hey, Azure Notebooks offers F# support).

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Fun with Markdown in Azure Data Studio

Dave Bland takes us through some of the formatting options available in Azure Data Studio notebooks:

When working in a Notebook you have two types of cells, text and code.  The focus of this post is how to format the text cell.  Of course text goes into this cell so that part is easy and of course the text can say anything you would like to say.  When we work with text in Word, there is a format tool bar that we can use to make it look like we want it.  The text cells do not have this toolbar.

You might be asking, without the format toolbar, does that mean we can’t format the text?  That answer is no….we can still format the text, we just need to do it slightly different.  Rather than use a toolbar, we need to use characters.

There’s a lot of power in Markdown.

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Preventing Lost Code in Azure Data Studio

Dave Bland shows how you can keep from losing code when you close Azure Data Studio:

After working on a query for a long time, we want to make sure that we save the changes we have made.  I have lost hours of work over the years because I didn’t save the changes.  Azure Data Studio has a few features that can help prevent this from happening.

Read on to learn how. With SSMS, this had historically been the domain of third-party plugins, but it’s built into VS Code and ADS.

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Azure Data Studio October 2019 Release

Alan Yu announces the October 2019 release of Azure Data Studio:

While fixing a bug involving copying rows and columns from the results grid, we ended up creating an innovative copy/paste experience with the results grid.

Typically, when you select random cells individually, pasting this into a grid like in Excel will prevent the pasting. However, we’ve implemented a logical pattern that would support this type of pasting. This works by ignoring columns and rows that are not selected, and nulling columns and rows that were not included in the copy parameters.

I really like that copy-paste functionality. Time to go update…

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Azure Data Studio Process Explorer

Dave Bland shows us the process explorer in Azure Data Studio:

Notice that the pids all point to the azuredatestudio.exe processes.  Azure Data Studio provides just a bit more information than Task Manager.  Please be careful changing the state of a service.  In other words, be careful stopping a process unless it is a last restore approach to fixing an issue.

The first thing I thought when looking at it wasn’t the Task Manager; it was Chrome’s process explorer.

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