More Testing of Inline Scalar UDFs

Erik Darling makes a FROIDian slip:

The idea behind FROID is that it removes some restrictions around scalar valued functions.

1. They can be inlined into the query, not run per-row returned
2. They don’t force serial execution, so you can get a parallel plan

If your functions already run pretty quickly over a small  number of rows, and the calling query doesn’t qualify for parallelism, you may not see a remarkable speedup.

Even in that case, Erik argues that you can still get some benefits from SQL Server 2019 bringing those scalar UDFs inline.

Related Posts

Adaptive Joins and Index Width

Erik Darling wants to pump your indexes up: Now, there’s an Extended Event that… Used to work. These days it just stares blankly at me. But since I’ve worked with this before, I know the problem. It’s that Key Lookup — I’ll explain more in a minute. Adaptive joins won’t do all the work for you, […]

Read More

Collecting the Last Actual Plan for a Query

Gail Shaw explains a new Dynamic Management Function which works to get the latest execution plan for a particular query: Getting the actual execution plan, that is the plan with run-time statistics for a query from an application has always been a little difficult. It’s fine if you can get the query running in Management […]

Read More

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Categories

June 2019
MTWTFSS
« May Jul »
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930