More Testing of Inline Scalar UDFs

Erik Darling makes a FROIDian slip:

The idea behind FROID is that it removes some restrictions around scalar valued functions.

1. They can be inlined into the query, not run per-row returned
2. They don’t force serial execution, so you can get a parallel plan

If your functions already run pretty quickly over a small  number of rows, and the calling query doesn’t qualify for parallelism, you may not see a remarkable speedup.

Even in that case, Erik argues that you can still get some benefits from SQL Server 2019 bringing those scalar UDFs inline.

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