The Banality of Containers

Grant Fritchey points out that containers hosting SQL Server are, in and of themselves, banal:

I’m only half joking when I say containers are boring and dull. They’re not. The technology is amazing. However, that technology doesn’t fundamentally change what you’re dealing with. It’s SQL Server. How do you capture detailed performance metrics in a container? Extended Events. How do you capture aggregated performance metrics and query plans in a container? Query Store. What’s the backup syntax for a database in a container? BACKUP DATABASE. We can keep going on this, but I won’t.

To a great extent, this is the same as SQL Server on Linux: once you have it installed, it works just like the Windows version (well, save for the things which aren’t there yet). All of the magical parts are in getting there.

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