Persisting SQL Server Databases on Kubernetes

Anthony Nocentino walks us through persistent volumes and Kubernetes:

One of the key principals of Kubernetes is the ephemerality of Pods. No Pod is every redeployed, a completely new Pod is created. If a Pod dies, for whatever reason, a new Pod is created in its place there is no continuity in the state of that Pod. The newly created Pod will go back to the initial state of the container image defined in the Pod’s spec. This is very valuable for stateless workloads, not so much for stateful workloads like SQL Server.

This means that for a stateful workload like SQL Server we need to store both configuration and data externally from the Pod to maintain state through the recreation of a Pod. Kubernetes give us constructs two constructs to do that, environment variables and Persistent Volumes. 

Read on for a good bit of background and a few scripts to help you get started.

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