Finding High-Cardinality Columns

Kevin Feasel

2019-04-08

T-SQL

Constantine Kokkinos shows how you can find the cardinality of each column on a SQL table:

Today I was diving into some extremely wide tables, I wanted to take a quick look at things like “How many unique values does this table have in every column?”.

This can be super useful if you have a spreadsheet of results or a schema without effective normalization and you want to determine which rows are the “most unique” – or have high cardinality.

The Github gist is embedded at the bottom of the page, but I will run you through the code in case you want an explanation of how it works

Click through for the script.

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