Comparing STRING_AGG Performance Against FOR XML PATH

Jeffry Schwartz compares the performance of STRING_AGG in SQL Server 2017 versus the tried and true method of FOR XML PATH for string concatenation:

Two different T-SQL methods were used for testing.  The FOR XML PATH solution incorporates the reverse and stuff functions along with FOR XML PATH.  The String_agg solution is much simpler, but is only available on SQL Server 2017 currently.

The FOR XML PATH method has been documented thoroughly over the years in many articles, so these explanations will not be repeated here.  However, two points are worth mentioning.  The first one is that the @strSeparator (in this case ‘ or  ’) string will reside at the end of the constructed string (in this case @strFilter).  Since the last occurrence of @strSeparator must be removed to prevent a syntax error, characters must be dropped from the end of the string.  Although it may seem obvious that four characters (the length of @strSeparator) should be removed, actually only three need be removed because the end of the constructed string is “r” not “ “.  Therefore, the length argument of the left function specification is the length of @strFilter minus three.

I like STRING_AGG a lot, primarily because I can remember it and I can explain it to people relatively new to SQL Server. Read on to see how they both compare in terms of performance.

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