Analyzing Autosteer Data (Or Lack Thereof)

Elliot Williams has an interesting analysis of the NHTSA report on Tesla’s Autosteer capabilities:

But the NHTSA report went a step further. Based on the data that Tesla provided them, they noted that since the addition of Autosteer to Tesla’s confusingly named “Autopilot” suite of functions, the rate of crashes severe enough to deploy airbags declined by 40%. That’s a fantastic result.

Because it was so spectacular, a private company with a history of investigating automotive safety wanted to have a look at the data. The NHTSA refused because Tesla claimed that the data was a trade secret, so Quality Control Systems (QCS) filed a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit to get the data on which the report was based. Nearly two years later, QCS eventually won.

Looking into the data, QCS concluded that crashes may have actually increased by as much as 60% on the addition of Autosteer, or maybe not at all. 

This is a great exercise in statistical analysis and the problem of garbage in, garbage out.

Related Posts

Linear Programming in Python

Francisco Alvarez shows us an example of linear programming in Python: The first two constraints, x1 ≥ 0 and x2 ≥ 0 are called nonnegativity constraints. The other constraints are then called the main constraints. The function to be maximized (or minimized) is called the objective function. Here, the objective function is x1 + x2. Two classes of […]

Read More

Exploratory Data Analysis with inspectdf

Laura Ellis continues a dive into Exploratory Data Analysis, this time using the inspectdf package: I like this package because it’s got a lot of functionality and it’s incredibly straightforward to use. In short, it allows you to understand and visualize column types, sizes, values, value imbalance & distributions as well as correlations. Better yet, […]

Read More

Categories

March 2019
MTWTFSS
« Feb Apr »
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031