Looking At Compressed Pages

Jess Pomfret shows us what compressed data looks like in SQL Server:

We first need to switch on trace flag 3604: this will write the output of our DBCC PAGE command to the messages tab instead of the event log.

There are 4 parameters for DBCC PAGE: we will need to pass in the database name (or id), the file number, the page id and the print option.  Using a print option of 0 will give us just the page header. In these examples I’m going to use option 3 which gives us more details on the rows stored on the page. For more information on using DBCC PAGE I’d recommend Paul Randal’s post “How to use DBCC PAGE“.

This kind of investigation lets you see how compression really works.

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