Misinterpretation and Misuse of P-Values and Confidence Intervals

Dave Giles has some good details on common problems of misinterpretation:

There are so many things in statistics (and hence in econometrics) that are easily, and frequently, misinterpreted. Two really obvious examples are p-values and confidence intervals.

I’ve devoted some space in earlier posts to each of these concepts, and their mis-use. For instance, in the case of p-values, see the posts here and here; and for confidence intervals, see here and here.

Click through for more in this vein, including a reference to an interesting-looking paper.

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