Deep Dive On Log Buffer Flushes

Itzik Ben-Gan delves into log buffer flushes and how SQL Server maintains durability without giving up too much performance:

The way SQL Server enforces transaction durability, in part, is by ensuring that all of the transaction’s changes are written to the database’s transaction log on disk before returning control to the caller. In a case of a power failure after a transaction’s commit was acknowledged, you know that all those changes were at least written to the on-disk transaction log. That’s the case even if the related data pages were modified only in the data cache (the buffer pool) but not yet flushed to the data files on disk. When you restart SQL Server, during the redo phase of the recovery process, SQL Server uses the information recorded in the log to replay changes that were applied after the last checkpoint and that haven’t made it to the data files. There’s a bit more to the story depending on the recovery model that you’re using and on whether bulk operations were applied after the last checkpoint, but for the purposes of our discussion, suffice to focus on the part that involves hardening the changes to the transaction log.

The tricky part in SQL Server’s logging architecture is that log writes are sequential. Had SQL Server not used some sort of a log buffer to alleviate log writes to disk, write-intensive systems—especially ones that involve lots of small transactions—would quickly run into terrible log-write-related performance bottlenecks.

To alleviate the negative performance impact of frequent sequential log writes to disk, SQL Server uses a log buffer in memory.

Itzik also covers a few technologies which can help if you’re experiencing log buffer flush-related slowness, including enabling delayed durability and purchasing nonvolatile memory (NVDIMM-N) for storage.

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