HASHBYTES On FOR JSON PATH Data

Kevin Feasel

2018-07-16

JSON, T-SQL

Greg Low walks us through a mechanism to check whether data has changed:

In a previous post, I wrote about how to determine if a set of incoming values for a row are different to all the existing values in the row, using T-SQL in SQL Server.

I later remembered that I’d seen a message by Adam Machanic a while back, talking about how FOR JSON PATH might be useful for this, so I did a little more playing around with it.

If you are using SQL Server 2016 or later, I suspect this is a really good option.

Click through to see an example using the WideWorldImporters database.

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