T-SQL Join Delete

Steve Stedman walks us through a bit of T-SQL proprietary syntax:

1
2
3
DELETE t2
FROM [dbo].[Table1] t1
INNER JOIN [dbo].[Table2] t2 on t1.favColor = t2.id;

Names have been changed to protect the innocent.

In the above delete statement which table will have rows deleted from it?

A: Table1

B: Table2

C: Both Table1 and Table2

D: Neither Table1 and Table2

Got it in one.  I like having this syntax available to me when I need it, even though it’s not ANSI standard.

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