Tracking Powershell Command Execution Time

Constantine Kokkinos shows how to track time spent on the last command in Powershell:

You can select any property from the output and get just the TotalSeconds, but I like this simple output for when I have to leave some work in progress and I need to come back and check some time in the future.

If you are confused by this code and want further explanations, keep reading!

That’s a lot simpler than the “classic” .NET way of setting up a StopWatch and tracking changes.

Related Posts

Approved Powershell Verbs

Richard Siddaway on approved verbs in Powershell: The other very useful set information are the synonyms for verbs that you shouldn’t use. For instance don’t use Append, Attach, Concatenate or Insert – use Add. Some of this information is contextual though as you shouldn’t use Pop or Out as a synonym for Exit BUT Pop […]

Read More

Going In-Depth On Powershell Arrays

Kevin Marquette has a tour de force on Powershell arrays: When your array is a collection of string or integers (value types), sometimes you will want to update the values in the array as you enumerate them. Most of the iteration loops above use a variable in the loop that holds the value. If you […]

Read More

Categories

April 2018
MTWTFSS
« Mar May »
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30