Tracking Powershell Command Execution Time

Constantine Kokkinos shows how to track time spent on the last command in Powershell:

You can select any property from the output and get just the TotalSeconds, but I like this simple output for when I have to leave some work in progress and I need to come back and check some time in the future.

If you are confused by this code and want further explanations, keep reading!

That’s a lot simpler than the “classic” .NET way of setting up a StopWatch and tracking changes.

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