Closure Tables: Graph Data In Relational Form

Phil Factor shows how to use the concept of closure tables to represent graph-style data in a relational database:

Closure tables are plain ordinary relational tables that are designed to work easily with relational operations. It is true that useful extensions are provided for SQL Server to deal with hierarchies. The HIERARCHYID data type and the common language runtime (CLR) SqlHierarchyId class are provided to support the Path Enumeration method of representing hierarchies and are intended to make tree structures represented by self-referencing tables more efficient, but they are likely to be appropriate for some but not all the practical real-life hierarchies or directories. As well as path enumerations, there are also the well-known design patterns of Nested Sets and Adjacency Lists. In this article, we’ll concentrate on closure tables.

A directed acyclic graph (DAG) is a more general version of a closure table. You can use a closure table for a tree structure where there is only one trunk, because a branch or leaf can only have one trunk. We just have a table that has the nodes (e.g. staff member or directory ‘folder’) and edges (the relationships). We are representing an acyclic (no loops allowed) connected graph where the edges must all be unique, and where there is reflexive closure. (each node has an edge pointing to itself)

Take the time to read this one carefully, as I think this model is applicable much more often than it’d appear at first blush.

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