Using Hive: Tiered Or Decoupled Storage?

Brandon Wilson and Gopal Vijayaraghavan compare a series of Hive queries against EC2 instances with persistent storage and S3:

There are advantages and disadvantages to each approach. The tiered approach has the most flexibility for an operator to tune the performance of the cluster while trading off size of the hot data zone for better performance or smaller resource footprint. The downside of this approach is that, having data on HDFS, resizing the cluster is a slow and tedious process due to HDFS needing to be rebalanced to achieve performance and fault-tolerance expectations. Thus this architecture is generally only used for statically sized clusters with steady, well-known workloads.

The decoupled architecture, on the other hand, enables maximum flexibility for cluster growth and reduction. For example, a cluster could run at 100 nodes during the day to support analytics and reporting and then shrink to 24 nodes overnight to support smaller ETL workloads. Historically, the disadvantage to decoupling is that cloud storage is not local and therefore could drastically affect runtime of the analytical workloads (hence the hybrid approach of tiered storage). However, the advent of LLAP in Hive 2.0 has limited this overhead making the approach far more attractive. The dynamic cache within LLAP also means that we do not need to statically define what data is hot. It can be inferred at query time (i.e., as users access the data, that data will become hot). We will look closer at how LLAP closes the runtime gap in the next section.

Historically, the argument was that you should avoid S3 in part because it’s relatively flaky compared to disks (in terms of performance and in its eventual consistency model).  It looks like that’s no longer a pressing concern.

Related Posts

Hooking SQL Server to Kafka

Niels Berglund has an interesting scenario for us: We see how the procedure in Code Snippet 2 takes relevant gameplay details and inserts them into the dbo.tb_GamePlay table. In our scenario, we want to stream the individual gameplay events, but we cannot alter the services which generate the gameplay. We instead decide to generate the event from the database […]

Read More

Notebooks in Azure Databricks

Brad Llewellyn takes us through Azure Databricks notebooks: Azure Databricks Notebooks support four programming languages, Python, Scala, SQL and R.  However, selecting a language in this drop-down doesn’t limit us to only using that language.  Instead, it makes the default language of the notebook.  Every code block in the notebook is run independently and we […]

Read More

Categories

April 2018
MTWTFSS
« Mar May »
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30