Backups Are Faster With SQL Server 2017

Parikshit Savjani explains how the SQL Server team was able to use indirect checkpoints to improve backup performance:

In RDBMS, whenever tables get larger, one of the technique to tune and optimize the scans on the tables is by partitioning it. With indirect checkpoints, we do the same.

In indirect checkpoint, for every database which has target_recovery_time set, a dirty page manager and dirty page list is created. The dirty page list is further partitioned by scheduler allowing the dirty page tracking to scale further. This decouples the dirty page scan for a given database from the size of the buffer pool and allows the scan to scale and be much faster than automatic checkpoint algorithm.

As Bob Dorr mentions in his blog here, a new database creation process in SQL Server 2016 requires only 250 buffers to scan as opposed to 500 Million buffers with former algorithm. This is the rationale for making indirect checkpoint a default which is much more scalable algorithm to track dirty pages in the buffer pool compared to automatic checkpoints.

Read on to see how this technology led to faster backups.

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