Using Let’s Encrypt Certificates To Encrypt SQL Server Connections

Daniel Hutmacher walks through the process of setting up a certificate on a SQL Server to enable connection encryption:

Based on a real-world scenario I encountered recently, here is the premise for this post. I’m putting it here at the top, so I won’t have to expand my post into a gazillion permutations for all imaginable types of scenarios and situations. However, I think you’ll be able to adapt the workflow to your particular setup.

  • SQL Server is running on an Azure VM with a connection to the Internet.

  • Stand-alone SQL Server – no clustering, no availability groups.

  • SQL Server has its own service account.

  • No web server installed on the machine.

  • I don’t have an Enterprise CA.

  • I can’t/won’t install certificates on my clients’ computers and servers.

Daniel has done yeoman’s work with this.  I highly recommend giving it a read.

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