Three Sessions And A Funeral

Solomon Rutzky explains what happens to sessions after they see the light at the end of the tunnel:

Sessions, in SQL Server, are born when a Connection is made from a client library to SQL Server. Temporary objects – Tables and/or Stored Procedures (yes, these are a thing) – may be created during a Session’s lifetime. The question is: for those temporary objects that are not explicitly dropped, what exactly happens to them? It is commonly known that they magically (ok fine, “automagically” — ok, ok, FINE, “automatically”) get dropped. But when do they get dropped? When the Session ends, right? And the Session ends when the Connection is closed, right? Well, that is certainly the common / conventional wisdom, at least. But is that understanding of the nature of Sessions and temporary objects correct?

It’s a more complicated topic than you might get from first appearances.

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