Kafka 1.0 Released

Kevin Feasel



Neha Narkhede announces Apache Kafka 1.0:

And Kafka 1.0.0 is no mere bump of the version number. The Apache Kafka Project Management Committee and the broader Kafka community has packed a number of valuable enhancements into the release. Let me summarize a few of them:

  • Since its introduction in version 0.10, the Streams API has become hugely popular among Kafka users, including the likes of PinterestRabobankZalando, and The New York Times. In 1.0, the API continues to evolve at a healthy pace. To begin with, the builder API has been improved (KIP-120). A new API has been added to expose the state of active tasks at runtime (KIP-130). The new cogroup API makes it much easier to deal with partitioned aggregates with fewer StateStores and fewer moving parts in your code (KIP-150). Debuggability gets easier with enhancements to the print() and writeAsText() methods (KIP-160). And if that’s not enough, check out KIP-138 and KIP-161 too. For more on streams, check out the Apache Kafka Streams documentation, including some helpful new tutorial videos.

  • Operating Kafka at scale requires that the system remain observable, and to make that easier, we’ve made a number of improvements to metrics. These are too many to summarize without becoming tedious, but Connect metrics have been significantly improved (KIP-196), a litany of new health check metrics are now exposed (KIP-188), and we now have a global topic and partition count (KIP-168). (That last one sounds so simple, but you’ve wanted it in the past, haven’t you?) Check out KIP-164 and KIP-187 for even more.

  • We now support Java 9, leading, significantly faster TLS and CRC32C implementations. Over-the-wire encryption will be faster now, which will keep Kafka fast and compute costs low when encryption is enabled.

And there are more where that came from.  Congratulations to the Kafka team for hitting this big milestone.

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