Error Handling On SQL With Linux

Anthony Nocentino explains Linux error codes and systemd behavior for SQL on Linux:

Now in the output above, you’ll notice a bolded line. In there, you can system that systemd[1] receives a return code from SQL Server of status=1/FAILURE.  Systemd[1] is the parent process to sqlservr, in fact it’s the parent to all processes on our system. It receives the exit code and immediately, systemd initiates a restart of the service due to the configuration we have for our mysql-server systemd unit.
What’s interesting is that this happens even on a normal shutdown. But that simply doesn’t make sense, return values on clean exits should return 0. It’s my understanding of the SHUTDOWN command, that it will cause the database engine to shutdown cleanly.

On the development side, there aren’t many differences between SQL on Linux versus SQL on Windows (aside from things which haven’t yet made the move); on the administration side, there are some interesting differences.

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