Docker Stop Versus Docker Kill

Andrew Pruski explains why docker kill is so much faster than docker stop:

When running demos and experimenting with containers I always clear down my environment. It’s good practice to leave a clean environment once you’ve finished working.

To do this I blow all my containers away, usually by running the docker stop command.

But there’s a quicker way to stop containers, the docker kill command.

Sending SIGTERM isn’t particularly polite and doesn’t let processes clean up, which could leave your process in an undesirable state during future runs.  But if you’re just re-deploying a container, you don’t really care about the prior state of the now-disposed container.

Related Posts

External Memory Pressure In SQL Server 2019 On Linux

Anthony Nocentino walks us through memory pressure in SQL Server on Linux: Now in SQL Server 2017 with that 7GB program running would cause Linux to need to make room in physical memory for this process. Linux does this by swapping least recently used pages from memory out to disk. So under external memory pressure, let’s look […]

Read More

Automating Azure SQL Database Scaling

Arun Sirpal shows how to use Azure Logic Apps to auto-scale Azure SQL Database: When I was presenting my Azure SQL Database session at DataRelay (used to be SQLRelay) I was asked (over coffee) about auto scaling capabilities. Quite simply there is nothing out of the box to achieve this. The idea of auto scaling […]

Read More

Categories

October 2017
MTWTFSS
« Sep Nov »
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031