Substrings: Powershell Versus T-SQL

Shane O’Neill contrasts the SUBSTRING function in T-SQL with Powershell’s Substring method:

The main difference that I can see when using SUBSTRING() in SQL Server versus in PowerShell is that SQL Server is very forgiving.

If you have a string that is 20 characters longs and you ask for everything from the 5th character to the 100th character, SQL Server is going to look at this, see that the string does not go to the 100th character, and just give you everything that it can.

It’s a small difference but an important one.

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