Production-Quality Powershell Functions

Missy Januszko has some tips on turning those Powershell scripts into reusable functions:

Breaking down your code may mean chopping apart your lengthy script into smaller pieces. As a best practice, a function should do only one thing. A retrieval cmdlet retrieves information and sends that information to the pipeline. Conversely, a functional cmdlet performs an act but not a retrieval act. It may take input from another cmdlet and act upon that input. It may or may not send output information to the pipeline. Lastly, output cmdlets format output in a desired display. As a result, this will allow us to use the pipeline more effectively to pass parameters between functions. In the above example, most of the function is a retrieval function. The exception is that it formats the output into a table with the last line. I will remove that line and let the user of the function decide how they want it formatted.

As a friendly warning to operations folks who are using more and more Powershell, when you do it right, you end up being a developer.  But we can keep that a secret, just between you and me.

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