Automating Azure SQL DB Maintenance

Tim Radney shows several methods for performing automated Azure SQL Database maintenance, including runbooks:

Once you create your account, you can then start creating runbooks. You can do just about anything with the runbooks. There are numerous existing run books that you can browse through and modify for your own use, including provisioning, monitoring, life cycle management, and more.

You can create the runbooks offline, or using the Azure Portal, and they’re built using PowerShell. In this example, we will reuse the code from the PowerShell demo and also demonstrate how we can use the built in Azure Service scheduler to run our existing PowerShell code and not have to rely on an on-premises scheduler, task scheduler, or Azure VM to schedule a job.

Read the whole thing if you have Azure SQL Database instances in your environment.

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