Scaling CheckTable With Respect To CPUs

Kevin Feasel

2017-05-31

DBCC

Lonny Niederstadt has a couple of posts on scaling DBCC CHECKTABLE based on degree of parallelism.  First, he looks at running the command with physical_only:

So we can use this formula when dop, elapsed_ms, and cpu_ms are known:

DOP * elapsed_ms = cpu_ms + idle_ms

That allows the 8 checktable operations to be summarized in this graph.  From DOP1 to DOP 8 the cpu_ms of the operation is extremely steady.  From DOP 1 to DOP 4 there are significant decreases in elapsed time as dop increases.  After dop 4, reduction in elapsed time is slight.  Throughout the tested range, idle_ms increased at a nearly linear rate.

In his second post, he looks at full CHECKTABLE runs and not just physical_only:

So the good news for today is that checktable operations without the physical_only option scale farther/better on my test tables than checktable with physical_only.  While with physical_only scaling benefits in elapsed time are primarily seen only to dop 4, without the physical_only option elapsed time benefits to increasing dop extend at least to dop 8.
And we saw that the shape of scalability graphs is pretty volatile 🙂  That’s largely because modest changes in elapsed time are multiplied by dop in this calculation to arrive at the idle_ms number – that idle_ms number is the one that changes shape most readily.

These are prologue posts to a discussion on the OLEDB wait type.

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