Gathering Detailed System Information On A Set Of Servers

Amy Herold has a quick Powershell script to retrieve detailed system info (via msinfo32.exe) for a set of servers:

With this script you can generate system information files and save them to a specified location. It makes sure a connection can be made to the server first, and then outputs the file. The files are created one at a time, so if you pass in a longer list of servers, you shouldn’t crash your machine. From my testing, this will take some time to run as these files don’t output quickly. Despite that, the output is worth it. This can be modified to pull your list of servers from a file or from a Central Management Server (CMS) instance.

This is a useful script, with the next step being to turn it into a cmdlet that accepts the set of servers from the pipeline.

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