Stop Profiling

Wayne Sheffield concludes his two-part series on converting a trace to use Extended Events:

This query extracts the data from XE file target. It also calculates the end date, and displays both the internal and user-friendly names for the resource_type and mode columns – the internal values are what the trace was returning.

For a quick recap: in Part 1, you learned how to convert an existing trace into an XE session, identifying the columns and stepping through the GUI for creating the XE session. In part 2 you learned how to query both the trace and XE file target outputs, and then compared the two outputs and learned that all of the data in the trace output is available in the XE output.

Read the whole thing.

Related Posts

Extended Events Profiler

Marek Masko shows off the new Extended Events Profiler In SQL Server Management Studio 17.3: XE Profiler looks promising and can be really a great feature. We can use it with no issues on any version of SQL Server which supports extended events – not only with newest SQL Server 2017. I tested it with […]

Read More

New Extended Events In SQL Server 2017

Erik Darling unwraps some of his Christmas presents a bit early: There are, as of RC2 being released, 194(!) new Events to Extend your mind with. Not all of them are interesting to me, and I haven’t had time to pry into all of the ones that are interesting just yet. This is a rundown […]

Read More

Categories