Stop Profiling

Wayne Sheffield concludes his two-part series on converting a trace to use Extended Events:

This query extracts the data from XE file target. It also calculates the end date, and displays both the internal and user-friendly names for the resource_type and mode columns – the internal values are what the trace was returning.

For a quick recap: in Part 1, you learned how to convert an existing trace into an XE session, identifying the columns and stepping through the GUI for creating the XE session. In part 2 you learned how to query both the trace and XE file target outputs, and then compared the two outputs and learned that all of the data in the trace output is available in the XE output.

Read the whole thing.

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