Partitioning Nullable Columns

Kenneth Fisher looks at what happens when you use a nullable column as a partition key:

So to start with how does partitioning handle a NULL? If you look in the BOL for the CREATE PARTITION FUNCTION you’ll see the following:

Any rows whose partitioning column has null values are placed in the left-most partition unless NULL is specified as a boundary value and RIGHT is indicated. In this case, the left-most partition is an empty partition, and NULL values are placed in the following partition.

So basically NULLs are going to end up in the left most partition(#1) unless you specifically make a partition for NULL and are using a RIGHT partition. So let’s start with a quick example of where NULL values are going to end up in a partitioned table (a simple version).

Click through to see Kenneth’s proof and the repercussions of making that partitioning column nullable.

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