Stopwatches

Drew Furgiuele explains how to use the .NET Stopwatch class in Powershell:

We can see I cleared the history buffer of my session ( Clear-History ), then ran a script. It’s nothing fancy; just connecting to my local instance of SQL Server and outputting a list of tables to a text file. With Get-History , I can see every command I put in the buffer, and using expressions I can calculate how long a command took.

And that’s great and all, but that’s the entire execution time. If there are multiple steps to your function, how long does each step take? If your script execution is 186 seconds, how much of time is spent on a database query? What about a loop? How long does each iteration take? Are you writing to a network share, and want to know what the latency is? Get-History  isn’t the tool of this, but thankfully we have other methods.

I use the stopwatch a lot for similar things; it’s a useful tool.

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