When Is NOLOCK Okay?

Kevin Feasel

2016-12-23

T-SQL

Erik Darling wants to figure out the acceptable boundaries for NOLOCK:

Picture a couple developers who started their app in the cloud, where they can’t get fancy with tempdb, fast disks aren’t in the budget yet, along with that beefier server with some extra RAM. They may not be able to turn on RCSI or SI at the drop of a hat; tempdb would keel over with the row versioning as part of a workload that already uses it pretty heavily.

They still need to run reports, either for users, or for higher ups at the company, and they can ask for them at any time. Caching the data when user activity is low and reporting against it when someone asks may raise some questions, like “why doesn’t my sales data show anything from today?”, or worse. You could invalidate the cache every X minutes, but that doesn’t help because then you need to re-run that reporting query every X minutes. That’s only moderately better than letting users query it at will.

Figuring out when read uncommitted is acceptable is a business decision.  As much as I dislike using NOLOCK, as long as the people on the business side understand the risks, it’s their call.

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