Notebook Practices

Jonathan Whitmore has good practices for managing Jupyter notebooks:

Here’s an example of how we use git and GitHub. One beautiful new feature of Github is that they now render Jupyter Notebooks automatically in repositories.

When we do our analysis, we do internal reviews of our code and our data science output. We do this with a traditional pull-request approach. When issuing pull-requests, however, looking at the differences between updated .ipynb files, the updates are not rendered in a helpful way. One solution people tend to recommend is to commit the conversion to .py instead. This is great for seeing the differences in the input code (while jettisoning the output), and is useful for seeing the changes. However, when reviewing data science work, it is also incredibly important to see the output itself.

So far, I’ve treated notebooks more as presentation media and used tools like R Studio for tinkering.  This shifts my priors a bit.

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