Counting Without Counts

Ewald Cress discusses the breferences member:

I’ll spare you my false starts, but I think I finally have it. The first observation is that, on the occasions breferences increments, it does not increment linearly, but instead has an exponential growth pattern. These increments take it through the sequence 0, 1, 3, 7, 15, 31, 127, 255 etc. Or in binary: 0, 1, 11, 111, 1111, 11111, 111111, 1111111, 11111111…

Those numbers can be seen as off-by-one variations of powers of two. Forget the offset, and think of the number as simply doubling on each increment if it keeps your head clearer – instead of accuracy, we have a order-of-magnitude reference count.

I’d never heard of an algorithm like this, although that could be due to my having dealt with relatively little low-level structural code.  I’m glad Ewald sussed out the mechanics driving breferences.

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