Data Compression

Melissa Connors discusses compression options and gives examples of data which will compress and that which will not:

Page Compression is what I like to refer to as “compression for real this time” as it goes well beyond the smart storage method of row and uses patterns/repeating values to condense the stored data.

First, to gain a better understanding of this method, check out a simple representation of a page of data. This is illustrated below in Figure 1. You’ll notice that there are some repeating values (e.g. SQLR) and some repeated strings of characters (e.g. SSSLL).

I really appreciate getting an idea of what kind of data does not compress well.  You’d think auto-incrementing numbers would be another scenario, but Melissa explains how that’s not necessarily the case.

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