Creating M Functions From Parameterized Queries

Chris Webb shows how to take a parameterized query in Power BI and create an M function from it:

All of these examples involve writing M code manually. The big change in the latest version of Power BI Desktop is that you can do the same thing using just the UI.

Let’s take the classic example of combining data from multiple Excel workbooks and update it to show how things work now.

Say you have a folder containing three Excel workbooks containing sales data for January, February and March and you want to load data from all three into a single table into Power BI. The first thing to do is to create a new parameter in Power BI Desktop that returns the filename, including path, of one of the Excel files. Call it ExcelFilePath and configure it as shown here:

This is pretty cool.

Related Posts

Comparing Power BI Files

Imke Feldmann shows off a new Power BI file comparison tool: What’s not covered?Nothing. The comparison includes everything from the pbit-files: So beneath your M and DAX code, you’ll see all about your visual definitions (incl. filters set !), row level security and much, much more. Actually, I found some information a bit noisy (like […]

Read More

Modeling Semi-Additive Measures

Paul Poco shows a couple techniques for modeling semi-additive measures in Analysis Services and Power BI: As mentioned earlier, the most commonly encountered approach is Option 2, the snapshot fact table. The main drawback of this approach is that the fact table’s size will grow extremely fast. For example, if you want to calculate the headcount in a company with 10,000 employees on average, and you want 5 […]

Read More

Categories

May 2016
MTWTFSS
« Apr Jun »
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031