Powershell + SQL Server

Shawn Melton provides an introduction to various ways to interact with a SQL Server instance via Powershell:

The most commonly known cmdlet out of this module is, Invoke-Sqlcmd. This is generally thought of as a PS replacement for the old sqlcmd command-line utility, that to date is still available in currently supported versions of SQL Server. You utilize this cmdlet to execute any T-SQL query that you want against one or multiple instances. The advantage you get using Invoke-Sqlcmd over the command-line utility is the power of handling output in PS. The output from the cmdlet is created as a DataTable (System.Data.DataRow is the exact type).

This is a good overview of the different methods available.

Related Posts

Recreating Dropped Azure SQL Managed Instance DBs

Jovan Popovic has a script to re-create an Azure SQL Managed Instance database which you might accidentally have dropped: Azure SQL Database – Managed Instance is fully-managed PaaS service that provides advanced disaster-recovery capabilities. Even if you accidentally drop the database or someone drops your database as part of security attack, Managed Instance will enable […]

Read More

Get Windows Failover Cluster Errors

John Morehouse walks us through the Get-ClusterLog cmdlet in Powershell: Sometimes you know that a problem occurred, but the tools are not giving you the right information.  If you ever look at the Cluster Failover Manager for a Windows Cluster, sometimes that can happen.  The user interface won’t show you any errors, but you KNOW […]

Read More

Categories

January 2016
MTWTFSS
« Dec Feb »
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031