UPDATE FROM Clause Usage

Rob Farley shows us UPDATE FROM:

1. It can let you access data in the columns of those tables, to use in predicates or expressions.

2. It can let you filter the data in the base table, by only allowing rows which match, such as when using an inner join or right outer join.

3. It can cause rows in the base table to be returned multiple times, if multiple rows in the joined table match a single row in the base table.

4. It can introduce NULL rows, if a full or right outer join is being done (or a left outer join with the base table second) and there are rows in the joined table that don’t match any rows in the base table.

This is a useful bit of T-SQL-specific syntax, but it’s a sharper edge than most UPDATE statements.  For a look back in history, Hugo Kornelis wanted to deprecate this syntax with the release of SQL Server 2008 (though MERGE has its own bugs and “Won’t Fix” problems, so in retrospect, perhaps it’s best that we still have UPDATE FROM).

Related Posts

Debugging a Pivot

Ed Elliott takes us through problems with the PIVOT statement: If you have a PIVOT query and it isn’t returning the data you expect, what can you do to troubleshoot it? The thing to do is to break it down into the constituent parts. First, lets take a look at a query and see what […]

Read More

Avoiding DONE Tokens in Loops

Emanuele Meazzo shows one reason why loops can be so much slower in T-SQL: Not everybody knows that SQL Server sends a DONE Token to the client each time that a SQL statement completes (so, everything except variable declarations); For the query above you can basically track it with extended events by tracking the “SQL Statement Completed” […]

Read More

Categories

January 2016
MTWTFSS
« Dec Feb »
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031