JSON Leads To New Wave Of 1NF Failures

Jovan Popovic talks about storing JSON in SQL Server:

Instead of single JSON object you can organize your data in this “collection”. If you do not want to explicitly check structure of each JSON column, you don’t need to add JSON check constraint on every column (in this example I have added CHECK constraint only on EmailAddresses column).

If you compare this structure to the standard NoSQL collection, you might notice that you will have faster access to strongly typed data (FirstName and LastName). Therefore, this solution is good choice for hybrid models where you can identify some information that are repeated across all objects, and other variable information can be stored as JSON. This way, you can combine flexibility and performance.

Okay, we’ve hit my first major problem with JSON support:  rampant violation of first normal form.  You can create check constraints on JSON code, and that’s pretty snazzy I guess, but I know a better way to store relational data in a relational database system.  JSON support is great when you ask SQL Server to be a holder of text blobs, but this is begging for bad design decisions.

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