Azure SQL Database Threat Detection

Warner Chaves has a video on Azure SQL Database Threat Detection:

As I mentioned, right now the tool is more of a reactive tool as it only lets you know after it has detected the anomaly. In the future, I would love to see a preventive configuration where one can specify a policy to completely prevent suspicious SQL from running. Sure, there can always be false alarms, however, if all the application query patterns are known, this number should be very low. If the database is open to ad-hoc querying then a policy could allow to only prevent the queries or even shut down the database after several different alerts have been generated. The more flexible the configuration, the better, but in the end what I want to see is a move from alerting me to preventing the injection to begin with.

In the demo, I’m going to go through enabling Azure SQL threat detection, some basic injection patterns and what the alerts look like. Let’s check it out!

This looks interesting.  I’ll have to give it a try on a test database.

Threat Modeling

Michael Howard discusses threat modeling in Azure:

Many conversations I have with customers go like this:

Customer: “We cannot deploy on Azure until we know that appropriate defenses are in place.”

Me: “I agree 100%, so let’s build a threat model for the proposed design and see what you need to do, and what Microsoft provides.”

A couple of days pass as we build and iterate on the threat model.

Now here’s when the customer has an “a-ha” moment. At the end of the process we have a list of defenses for each part of the architecture and we all agree that the defenses are correct and appropriate.

It’s at that point the customer realizes that they can deploy a cloud-based solution securely.

My tongue-in-cheek response is, of course a customer can deploy a cloud-based solution securely if they have Michael Howard walking them through it.  Michael does include some links on Azure security configuration and threat modeling resources so check those out.

SQL Injection Is Still Around

K Brian Kelley notes that SQL injection is still a viable security risk:

Keep in mind that from an architecture perspective, the primary place to stop SQL injection attacks is by validating the input when it comes in. If the input doesn’t match appropriate patterns, especially in the case of a banking application where the likely patterns for each input should be easily defined, you reject it at that level. It then doesn’t get appended or inserted into a text string which becomes the SQL statement to be executed against a database server.

If you don’t get it at this level, the ability to prevent the SQL injection attack gets much harder. Perhaps IDS/IPS can detect based on some text matches. We might be able to do the same thing within the database, say by using DML triggers. However, if the appended text generates queries that are basically what normally gets sent back, none of the back-end solutions are going to be very effective.

Pick your language and parameterize your queries.

Database Detachments And File Permissions

Daniel Hutmacher looks at what happens when you detach a database:

On most database servers, the SQL Server service account is granted full control of the directories that host the database files. It goes without saying that the service account that SQL Server runs on should be able to create, read, write and delete database files. Looking at a sample database on my local server, the .mdf and .ldf files don’t actually inherit permissions from their folder, although the permissions are very similar to that of the folder.

This all makes sense once you read the explanation, but it’s not intuitive behavior.  Read Daniel’s gotcha near the end of the post.

Deny Everything

Kenneth Fisher goes over grant, revoke, and deny for permissions:

This means that MyUser can not run a SELECT statement against any table, view or table valued function in the database.

That probably doesn’t sound like you are applying a permission does it? And that is probably where a lot of the confusion comes in. If, however, we take a look at the system views where the data resides then we can see proof that both commands, GRANT and DENY, add a permission.

Particularly interesting is exactly how the deny permission works—and that “deny” is in fact a “permission” in that you modify a permissions list.

Row-Level Security With Power BI

Koen Verbeeck discusses dynamic, row-level security using Power BI:

Apparently, in PBI the domain is used, not the email. Good to know if row level security is implemented in PBI someday (note: currently it’s only available in the Power BI Service).

OK, now let’s upload this report to the Power BI Service so we can implement the RLS. When the report is opened, it seems  that my carefully crafted measures are ignored. Maybe Power BI ignores the USERNAME() function as long as there is no RLS defined.

I like the fact that you can test by role, making it a lot easier to see what others would see under those circumstances and finding bugs with security implementation.  If you have any non-public information and you use Power BI, this is a must-read.

Credentials And Proxies

Kenneth Fisher shows how to use credentials and proxies to run external objects (like SSIS packages and Powershell scripts) through the SQL Server Agent:

There are purposes for credentials other than a proxy, but for our purposes you are just going to enter an AD username and password. Just to be even more clear, this is an AD/Windows user. Not a sql server login.

In Object Explorer: ServerName -> Security -> Right click on Credentials and select New Credential -> Fill in the Name, Identity and Password fields.

Kenneth’s getting fancy with animated GIFs, and gives us a good walkthrough of this aspect of SQL Agent security.

Joining Ubuntu To AD

Chrissy LeMaire shows us how to connect to AD from Ubuntu:

Since 2009, it seems that a couple things have changed in the client realm. In particular, winbindfell out of favor to Likewise Open (which I used to <3) which was bought by BeyondTrust and turned into PowerBroker Open. But that’s since fallen out of favor to the SSSD or “System Security Services Daemon“. SSSD seems pretty cool but everyone hates its name and assume that its name is keeping it from greater adoption.

Sometimes when researching SSSD, you’ll come across a few mentions of FreeIPA which is similar to Active Directory, OpenLDAP, and ApacheDS. Oh, and I recently found out thatSamba4 allows Linux servers to join Active Directory as Domain Controllers (!!) but I can’t tell if it can be a forest of its own (reddit review here).

There are other players I’m leaving out but after a bit of casual research, no others seem to stand out. Ultimately, while there are a number of ways to setup AD/Linux authentication with Ubuntu, it appears that SSSD is the current way to go. Let’s go ahead and set that up.

Cf Ryan Adams and LeMaire’s separate posts back in March on the topic.  As Microsoft gets serious about Linux integration, I would love to see them simplify this process significantly, either by updating an existing open-source project (my preference) or creating their own open-source project.

CLR Turned Off In Azure SQL Database

Brent Ozar reports that Azure SQL Database’s CLR will be turned off:

Details are still coming in, but in the Reddit AMA for the Azure database teams (going on as we speak), it’s one of the users reports that they got an email that SQL CLR will be shut off in one week due to a security issue.

The cloud: at the end of the day, it’s just someone else’s server, and they can – and will – take tough actions to protect their product, their users, their security, and their profits.

I’m curious for more details.  I’d like to know if this is particular to Azure or affect on-prem installations as well.

Securing Plaintext Passwords

John Morehouse shows you how to fix plaintext password storage when you can’t fix the application:

Once the data has been encrypted, we can move forward with creating a new view that will be used to “head fake” the application. The view is named the same as the original table therefore the change is seamless to the application.  The application doesn’t know if it’s calling a table or a view so that’s why this works.

You should never store passwords in plaintext.  You should almost never store passwords in a reversable format (i.e., encrypted).  The primary case in which I can see storing passwords encrypted rather hashed is if you have automated systems (or non-automated technicians) which need passwords to authenticate somewhere.  Even then, there’s a lot of value in using OAuth tokens.  But if you can’t get around any of this, John’s solution does remove the really bad decision of leaving passwords in plaintext.

Categories

July 2017
MTWTFSS
« Jun  
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31